Index

Indice del 1827

A B C D E F G I L M N O P Q R S T U . V. Y Z

A

The habit of material activity of the body communicates itself to the spirit: and similarly other material habits. 1719,1 
Literary academies. 144,1  161,1 
Adulators and friends of tyrants. 507,1 
Adjectives used as adverbs. 4012,1  4053,7  4068,4 
Agriculture. 342,1  2686,1  2454,2 
Albinos. Vedi Mori bianchi. See White Moors.
Alphabet. Vedi Scrittura. Lettere. See Writing. Letters.
Various alphabets in nature. 51,6  54,2  191,1  711,1  1014,3  1338,3  1342,1  1346,3  1816,1  2740,1 
Alfieri. 701  2453,1  2455,2  2595,1  3418  3458-3459 
Joyfulness and sadness. The different acts produced by them. 69,6 
Cheerfulness. 255,1  1328,1  1690,1  2809,margine 2905  3310,1 
Allegro in music. 3364,1 
Height, pleasing. 2257,2  2350,1 
Friendship. 104,1  324,3  532,1  1724,1  2045,1 
On preserving friendships: the ease, wish and pleasure of many in breaking them. 4274,2 
Love toward animals. 1823,1 
Love of body politic. 149,1.2  150,2.3  151,2  457,1  872,1  1715,2 
Love of township, of province, etc. 2628,1 
Love of partisanship. 113,3  299,1  872,1  1606,1  2156,1 
Love for one's fellows. 133,1  536,1.2  540,1  542,1  591,1  1688,1  1823,1  1847,1  2043,1  2429,2  3928,5 
Love of life, its metaphysical definition, etc. 4127,9  Vedi Vita. See Life.
Angels. Vedi Démoni. See Daemons.
Animals. They use all of their forces: man not so. 1378,1 
Application of this observation to the mad, drunk and desperate. How much the progress of spirit has deprived man of physical force, how many animals are considered of superior strength to man, whereas they are not. 4079,1  4272,2 
Animals, different in character according to climate, like humans. 1798,1 
[Animals,] perhaps to be civilized one day. 4279,4 
[Animals.] Love bright colors. 1798,2 
Animals for the most part, women, southerners, are happier than humans, males, northerners; that is because they have shorter lifespan, faster development, more intense life. 4062,5  4092,1 
Human spirits believed to be of divine origin. Vedi Démoni. See Daemons.
Ancients. 112,2 [112,1]   115,2  116,2  121,1  123,2  125,2  130,1  131,2  162,2  163,1  195,2  197,1  204,2  207,2  222,1  231,1  253,1  254,1  266,1  270,3  274,1  277,1  280,2  285,2  328,1  338,1.2  340,1  343,1  352,2  420,2  453,1.2  473,3  459,1  463,1  474,2  484,1  503,1  520,1  528,1  536,3  543,1  590,1  593,2  598,4  601,3  611,1  618,2  625,3  661,2  663,1.2  678,3  684,2  725,1  866,1  872,1  911,1  923,1 [923,2]   926,2  931,2  1001,2  1004,1  1009,1.2  1016,1  1018,1  1026,1  1028,4  1037,1  1043,1  1078,1  1083,2  1096,1  1163,3  1165,2  1169,1  1174,2  1175,1  1315,1  1330,1  1347,1  1361,3  1362,1  1364,1  1378,1  1422,1  1470,1  1482,1  1487,1  1494,1  1554,2  1555,1  1563,1  1573,1  1606,2  1607,1  1794,1  1842,1  1860,1  1899  1975,1  1988,1  1988,3  2088,1  2215,1  2420,1  2434,2  2544,1  2583,1  2736,1  2759,2  2987,3  3029,1.2  3251-53  3291,1  3482,1  3520,1  3613,1  3638,3  3676,1  3909,2  3921,1  4185,2  4256,1  4281,3  4289,2 
There is still a lot left for us to recover from ancient civilization, especially in terms of the body; and the progress of modern civilization is still for the most part a renaissance. 4289,1 
The ancients did everything for eternity, the moderns for the moment. The application of this thought to architecture, literature, etc. Notable observations. 3435,1  4267,3  4268,7 
Humanity of the ancients, superior to that of the moderns. 4245,1 
Ancients, not very exact in the descriptions of passions and characters: and why. 3482,1 
[Ancients.] Regarding metaphysics and morals they knew and said everything. 4172,3 
[Ancients.] in fact, they knew more about these things [metaphysics and morals] than the moderns: and why. 4192,1  4206,4 [4206,3]  
Antiquity. We know only its last epoch, of Greeks and Romans. 926,1 [926,2]  
Antiquity, pleasurable. 1429,1  2263,1 
Cannibalism. Vedi Barbarie. See Barbarisms.
Parables. 67,2  4119,9 
Apologists (religious). 348-49 
Apotheosis. Vedi Démoni. See Daemons.
Archaisms. Writing in an old-fashioned manner. 1098,3  1243,3  1887,1  2395,2  2683,1  2718,1  3407  3465  3856-58  3866,1 
Ariosto. 727  1449,1  1789,1  3415  3976,1 
Aristocracy. Oligarchy. 608,1  709,1  3471,1 
Aristotle. Theophrastus. Their style. 2728-29 
Harmony, grace, etc. of words, pronunciation, verse, etc. 1207,1  1875,seguente[-1877,1]   1878,1  1961,1 [1961,2]   1965,2  2415,3  3247,1  4026,7  Vedi Numero. See Number.
Harmonies of Nature. 32,1  64,1  71,3  228,3  255,1  358,1  3513,seg  [-3514] 3553,1 [3553,2]   4062,5 
Harpies, Harpyiai, in Homer, etc. 2775-2776  2786,1  2918,1 
Arrian. 126,1  468,1  1024,2  1495  2181  2408,1  2591 
Art. Mechanical arts and crafts, banausoi, harmful to health, how they were seen by the ancients and how by the moderns. 2454,2  2686,1 
The absurdity of the arts and sciences invented to outdo other men, such as fencing, tactics, etc. 4197,8 
There is less art and politics in people's behavior and more sincerity than is generally believed. 4195-4196 
The art of composition, among the ancients and among the moderns. 2475,2  4213,7  4267,3  4268,7 
[The art of composition.] Sign of mastering this art is regarding it as difficult and vice versa; applied to all the arts. 3673,1 
Art of memory. 2378,1 
Art of being unhappy. 271,2  306,1  676,3  1584,1.2  2684,1  4294,5 
Art and Nature. Comparison of their force and value in literature, in gallantry, etc. 2568,1 
Every other merit in style can be received from nature, but clarity and naturalness come from art alone. 3047,1  3050,1 
Vedi Natura e Fortuna. See Nature and Fortune.
Nature's artifice in the universe; whether it is truly admirable. 4142,1  4204,1  4248,9  4257,11 
Asia. Population or civilizing of Europe coming from Asia. Ancient tradition in this regard. 4048,6 
Attention. Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Augustus. 117,2  2527  3501

B (Inizio pagina)

Bandi. The story of countess Bandi of Cesena and similar cases; their parallels in antiquity. 4218,3 
Barbarism, presupposes a beginning state of civilization: the savages are barbarians because of their inchoate civilization. 4185,1 
Extreme barbarism of socialized savages: civilization renders man more natural; primitive societies are the furthest away from nature, just like the style of a child or a beginner is the least natural. Cannibalism. 3797,1  4047,1  4135,5  4185,1 
Barbarism in languages. 819,1  863,1  952,1  985,1  1263,1  4120,20 
Barbarism in civilization. 4025,1  4047,1 
Barbarisms. 2500,2 
Bards. Vedi Ossian. See Ossian.
Daniello Bartoli. 1313,1  2197,3  2396,1  2523,1  3630,1 
Beauty as defined by Aristotle and by Theophrastus. 306,1 
Pure beauty; not very appealing. 269,1  270,2  1530,1 
Beauty; a sign of goodness. 1594,2 
Beauty of women; always controversial. 1367,1 
Bembo and Cesari. 4249,2 [4249,3]  
Unexpected fortune. 73,1 [73,2]   188,4 
Benefaction. Interest in others. 614,2  618,1.2  Vedi Compassione. Interesse per altrui. See Compassion. Interest in others.
Bible. Biblical poetry. 13,1  1028,4  1211,3  2615  3543,2  3567-68 
Goodness, to what extent it is esteemed by the ancients and by the moderns, proven by the nouns euêtheia, credulity, etc. 4201,8 
Bossuet. 217,1  218,1  246,1  374  689  2198  2427-28 
Certificates or patents of inventions in ancient times. 4255,2 
Brevity in occupations, pleasures, writings, etc., why it is pleasurable. 1507,2 
Brevity in language, writing, etc. 1822,1 
Burchiellesque style, Frottole, etc., used also by the Greeks. 4182,9 

C (Inizio pagina)

Hunting. 2204,1 
Song and Sound. 1721,2  1759,1  1927,2  2017,1  3426,1 
Cantus firmus. 3020,1 
Hair. Variety of tastes regarding its styling. 3984,2  3988,1 
Moral character of people, as represented by others. 194,3 
Character of people, varies according to the air, the country, the climate, etc., and so does the intellect. 3891,2  4031,1 
Character of young men, strong, etc., lovers more of war than of peace in society, of having enemies rather than friends, but otherwise good. 3942,2 
Character of buffalo herders and of horse herders in the Roman countryside. 2691,2 [2691,3]  
Characters that are extraordinary, without being extraordinarily great or small. 1623-24 
Character variations in the same individual at different times and ages. 4064,1 
Caro (Annibale). 2525,1  2534-35  2840  3063  3415-16 
Giovanni della Casa. His lyric poetry. 3415-16 
Domestic (life). 3676,1 
Chance. Discoveries, civilization, etc. owed to chance. 830,1  1086,1  1570,1  1611,1  1737,2  2602,2  2606,1  2620  3661,1 
Castes. Division in Castes. 917 e seguenti  920 
Chivalric (ideas, spirit, tales etc.). 1084,1 
Gallantry toward women is not owed to Chivalry, nor to the peoples of the North. 4053,3  4144,3 
Celtic (language etc.) 994-95  1010  1014,2  1015  1024,1  1163,3  3366,1 
Ceremonies. The Italians, who are derided for their use of ceremonies, do not have a single one of those (equally ridiculous) used by the French. 4265,1 
Ceasar. 467,1  2487,1  3282 
Cesari and Bembo. 4249,3 
Chesterfield. An expert of Italian language and matters. His judgments about these, on Petrarch, etc. 4249,1 
Chiabrera. 24,3  26,1  28,3 
Clarity in speech. Does not always, nor mainly, derive from having clear ideas. 1372,1 
Wondrous and extraordinary clarity and facility of Isocrates. 4250,3 
Clarity. Vedi Naturalezza e Chiarezza. Precisione e Chiarezza. See Naturalness and Clarity. Precision and Clarity.
Chinese, their language, customs, music, literature, etc. etc. 942,1  943,1.2  944,1.2  1019,1  1055,2  1059,1  1179,1  1570  2620-21  2750  3211-3215  3666-3671 
Cicadas, crickets, etc. (their song) 158,1  159,1 
Cicero. 743,1  1932,2  2014,1  2150,1  2240  2410  2475,2  2663,2  3440  3475,1  4067  4088,5  4281,3  Vedi Filippiche. See The Philippics.
Numeric figures. 1398,2 
Circumlocutions. 638,1  2721,2 
Cities, first founded by whom, according to Scripture. 191,2 
polis used for countries; land for cities. The reason for these meanings. 4158,8 
Cities out of reach. 1831,2 
Cities small and large. 2405,1  2484,2  3546,1 
Civilization. Civilizing process. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Civiltà, Incivilimento. See separate slips entitled Civilization, Civilizing process 76,2  114,2  115,1  118,1.2  128,1  130,2  131,1  147,1  150,2.3  151,1.2  162,2  163,1  195,2  205,1  207,2  220,1.2  252,1  262,2  266,1  270,3  277,2 [277,1]   280,1 [280,2]   283,1  326,1  358,2  401-402  407-409  420,2  474,2  520,1  542,2  543,1  579,2  590,1  593,2  611,1  112,2  618,2  625,3  646,1  663,1.2  669,1  678,3  720,1  721,1  723,1  823,1.2.3  823,3  830,1  866,1  868,1  870,1  872,1  911,1  923,1 [923,2]   925,2  936,1  978,1  1020,1  1022,1  1053,1  1077,1  1100,1.2  1165,2  1169,1  1170,1  1174,2  1175,1  1315,1  1378,1  1386,1  1436,1  1459,1  1554,2  1555,1  1594,2  1596,1  1607,1  1630,1.2  1631,2  1648,1  1668,1  1669,1  1682  1691,2  1737,2  1804  1823,1  1831,2  1952,1  1957,2  1959,1.2  1981,1.2  1985,1  1988,1  1999,2  2152,1  2204,1  2220-21  2250,1 [2250,2]   2256,1.2  2337,2  2436,1  2455,1  2479,2  2558,1  2677,1  2684,1  2736,1  3029,1  3029,2  3082,1  3179,1  3613,1  3643,1  3676,1  3773,1  3909,2  3921,1  3936,1  4120,20  4135,5  4185,2 [4185,1]   4265,4 
Civilization; the extent to which it makes people different from and superior to savages. 2479,1 [2479,2]  
Civilization and progress do nothing but multiply needs and sufferings, and then seek remedies for them. 4180,4 
Civilization goes from south to north. 1026,1  2331,1  4256,1 
half-civilization. 2331,1 
Conjectures on a future civilization of animals. 4279,4 
Ancient civilization, Greek and Latin, is not identical to the modern but is something completely different. 4171,1  Vedi Antichi. See Ancients.
European civilization could have been very different from what it is and was, just like Chinese civilization is very different, etc. 1570,1 
Classics. 307,1 
Codex Justinianus. 303,2 
Human knowledge, cannot be certain. 1771,1 
Banquets of the ancients and of the English. 4183,2 
Comets, why they are feared. 3433,1 
Ancient and Modern comic writers. 41,3  58,5  63,1 
In order to be a good Comic or Satirical writer one must be or must have been worthy of comedy or satire. 4173,3 
Greek comedy. 3482,1 
Bodily comforts. 830,1 
Compassion, Benefaction, Self-sacrifice, Interest for others, etc. are typical of the young, the strong, the healthy, the fortunate, the joyful, the courageous, etc., even if they are irate and vindictive, etc. Insensitivity, egoism etc. are typical of the old, sick, weak, unfortunate, timid, sad, etc., even if they are gentle. 3271,1  3765,1  3836,1  4024,5  4105,2  4231,2  4282,10  4283,2  4287,1 
Compassion for animals. 29,5  3556 
Compassion for the dead. 4277,1 
Compounds. Compound words. 735,1  928,2  943,1  984,1  1292,1  2005,1  2277,3  2443,1  2595,1  2630,2  2633,1  2756  2876,2  3017,1  3902,4  4022,2  4088,5 
Communicating one's pleasures and displeasures to others (human inclination). 230,1  339,2  486,1  532,1  592,1  1535,1  1583,2  2471,1  3804  4014,1 
Communicativeness. 1372,1 
Contradictory and inconsistent behavior of individuals. 135,1 
[Behavior of individuals,] unreasonable and ill-calculated most of the time. Those who believe to decipher others' intentions based on utility are deceiving themselves. 4058,1 
Concurrence of vowels. 1157,1  1151,1  2316,1 [2316,2]   3706  3731,4  4028  Vedi Digamma eolico. See Eolic digamma. Dittonghi. Diphthongs. Sinizesi. Synizeses. V, lettera V, letter.
Self-confidence and Lack of self-confidence. 960,1  3188 
Conquest of Mexico. Vedi Ritirata. See Retreat.
General consensus does not prove anything in favor of a proposition. 4131-4132 
Consolation. 271,2  139,2  302,1  313,1  324,4  496,2  512,1  712,1  65,1  188,2  503,1  1364,1  1400,1  1651,1  1970,2  2150,2  2419,2  2607,1  2599,1  2661,1  2674,2  3529,1  4243,8  4277,1  Vedi Solitudine. See Solitude.
Art of consoling oneself.
Consolations of the ancients. 76,4  1364,1  2943,1  4208,1 
Latin continuative verbs. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Continuativi latini See separate slips, entitled Latin continuative verbs 1104,1  1504,1  2324,1  2624,1  2659,1  2688,1  2779,1.2  2792,1  2793,1  2809,1  2813,1  2815,1  2818,1  2819,1.2  2820,2.3  2821,1.2.3  2826,1  2835,1.2  2836,1  2842,1  2865,2  2882,1  2889,2  2890,1  2893,1 [2893,2]   2894,1  2895,1  2904,margine 2917,1  2924  2925,1  2928,2  2930,1  2935,2 [2935,1]   2947,1  2972,1.2  2974,1  2974,3  2984,1 [2984,2]   2985,1  2986,1  2986,3  3001,2  3019,1  3023,1  3032,1  3053,1  3054,1  3063,2  3064,1  3071,1  3073,3  3074,1  3074,3  3080,1  3170,1 [3170,2]   3234,1 [3234,2]   3235,1  3246,2  3262,2 [3263,2]   3283,1.2  3284,1  3288,1.2  3289,1.2  3298,1.2  3298,4.5  3299,2  3312,1  3350,1  3350,3.4  3352,1  3361,1  3460,1  3477,1.2  3491,2  3514,1  3541,1.2  3542,1.2  3543,1  3543,3  3547,1.2  3548,1  3557,1  3558,2  3568,1 [3568,3-3570,1]   3584,3 [3584,4]   3589,1 [3588,1]   3616,2  3617,1.2  3618,4  3619,1.2  3624,1  3625,1  3629,1  3630,2  3631,1  3638,2  3684,3.4  3684,6  3686,3  3693,1.2  3695,3  3710,1  3711,1  3713,1  3722,1  3722,3  3731,3  3732,1  3735,2  3742,2  3745,1  3756,1  3761,3  3762,2  3764,3  3764,5  3772,1  3810,1  3811,1  3815,1  3815,4  3816,4  3826,3  3828,3.4  3834,1  3834,4  3843,2  3845,1  3849,1  3849,3  3852,4  3869,1  3886,2.3  3894,1  3897,2.3  3900,1.2  3900,5  3901,1  3901,3  3903,2  3904,2  3908,2  3927,2  3928,2.3  3938,5  3939,1  3939,4.5  3949,1  3956,1  3960,1  3960,4  3961,1  3984,1  3986,2  3989,2  3996,3  3998,3  3999,2  4004,6  4006,4  4008,3  4009,7  4011,2  4013,2  4015,4  4022,5  4024,4  4025,2  4025,5  4030,6.7  4033,4  4034,1  4036,1.2  4036,5  4037,3  4037,4  4040,1  4040,3  4042,4  4044,5  4045,1  4048,1.2  4048,5  4050,4  4050,8  4056,1  4056,3  4068,2  4075,1  4083,1  4086,1  4086,2  4086,4  4087,3  4087,5  4088,4  4089,2  4089,5.6  4093,4  4093,6  4096,1  4101,7  4112,1.2.7  4114,3  4114,8  4115,1  4116,3  4117,2  4118,7  4118,8  4118,13  4119,1  4120,5  4120,12  4121,11  4121,13  4122,5  4122,6  4122,11  4123,1  4123,4  4126,11  4127,4  4134,2  4138,1  4141,1  4147,1  4148,7.8  4150,8  4151,8  4153,2  4154,5  4154,9  4155,1.2  4156,1  4158,5  4160,2 [4160,3]   4160,4  4160,9  4164,5  4165,2  4166,7  4167,1  4170,14 [4170,11]   4172,1  4177,4.5  4182,5  4188,11  4196,1  4197,4  4201,2  4201,5  4217,2  4224,2  4227,3  4237,7  4239,4  4245,4  4248,4  4254,2.3  4255,3  4268,3  4287,7 
Latin continuative verbs that are not formed from supine ones. 2813,1  3288,2  3897,1 [3897,3]   3904,3  3942,1  4004,2  4020,1  4081,3  4087,3  4089,1  4105,1  4125,8  4151,9  4170,9  4177,6  4188,11  4196,2  4213,5  4218,2  4247,2  4248,5  4257,6  4283,3  4287,5 
Continuations or Imitations of classical works. 101,1  143,1  2978,marg. 2976,1  3461,1  3941,3 
Contradictions and monstrosities, evident and horrible, in the system of Nature and of existence. 4099,2  4127,9  4133,2  4169,1  4174,1 [4174,2]   4188,13  4248,9  4257,11 
Ridiculous contradictions in said system [of Nature and of existence]. 4204,1 
Contradictions, necessary and inevitable in the system of civilized life. 2337,2  2454,2  2686,1  3773,1 
Contrast. Everything is animated by contrast and languishes without it. Even virtue by the contrast with vice. 2156,1 
Conversation in the French manner. Cannot be held in good Italian. 1946,1  1985,1  2136,1  3862 
In conversation it is better to let others remain discontent with you, rather than content. 2271,1 
People who are well- and ill-suited for conversation. 3183,1  3360,1  4294,5 
Conversation in Italy, in small cities, etc. 3546,1 
Conversation in different climates. 4031,1 
Copernicus (his system). 975,1 [975,2]  
Chorus in plays. 2804,1 
Physiques of several ancient peoples. 1601 
Corruption and decadence of man, caused by knowledge, is recognized by the ancients. 398-399  433,1  450,1  637,1  723,1  1004,1  2114,1  2250,2 [2250,3]   2401,2  2939,1  3646  3666-3667 
Così, sic, outȏs etc. redundant. 3170,1  4121,4  4164,6  4211,2  4232,1 
Constitutions. Constitutional monarchy. 575,1  3889,1 
Ancient customs similar to modern ones. The antiquity of customs that are believed to be modern. 4144,4  4158,8  4182,9  4183,2  4199,1  4203,1  4224,marg. 4125,1  4206,1  4206,3  4218,3  4219,1  4255,2  4280,3 
Customs etc., similar in peoples which had no known relation with one another. 3961,4 
Christianity, has made customs worse. 80,3 [80,2]   , 132,1  898,segg  2481,3  2492,2 
[Christianity.] Teaches the nullity of life and of human things, unlike ancient religions. 105,1  116,2  131,2  253,1  254,1  453,2  1364,1  4208,1 
[Christianity.] Has produced atheism. 1059,2 
[Christianity.] How it was established: its nature, its effects, etc. 334,3  353,1  420,2  1426,1  1460,1  1469,1  1685,1  1824,2  2232,1  2252,1  2381,1  2456,1  2574,1  2739  3148-52  3494,1  3497,1  4103,6  4238,4  4290,1 
[Christianity.] Agrees in many respects with my system on Nature. 393,2  436,1  1004,1  1626  1619,1  1627,1.2  1637,1  2114,1  2178,1  2263,2  2666-2667[3666-67]  
Cult. Vedi Religione. See Religion.

D (Inizio pagina)

Dante. 21,2  152,2  231,2  700-2  727  762  1028,4  1228  1317,1  1366,1  1403  1525,1  1688,2  1809  1993,2  2041,1  2126,1  2396,1  2504  2505-6  2517  2523,1  2536  2573,1  2791 [2790]   3011-4  3291  3479,1  3507-8  3552,marg. 3561,2 [3561,1]   3719,marg. 3884,1  3964-5  4214,3 
[Dante.] Service he did to Europe and the human spirit by using the vernacular in literature. 3338,1  4214,3 
Vedi Tasso e Dante. See Tasso and Dante.
Weakness, appealing. 108,1  164,1  196,1  211,1  220,3  221,1  233,4  281,1  940,2  1522,1  1990,1  3553,2  3610  4255,6 
Bodily weakness, produced by the process of civilization, etc. Vedi Malattie. See Diseases.
Demetrius called Phalereus and his on elocution. 4216,1 
Daemons. Angels. Human spirits of divine origin, Demigods, Apotheosis, etc. 3544,2  4048,3  4050,2  4076,3  4094,2  4110,3  4117,1  Vedi Divinità antiche. Semidei. See Ancient Divinities. Demigods.
Desire. 1653,1  2602,2  3443,1  3497,1  4126,3 
As long as he thinks, man desires. 3842,2  3846,2  3876,1  4126,3 
Desire for life. 829,2 
Desires satisfied. 210,1 
Latin dialects. 1020,1  1476,1  2120,1  2201  2649,1  2654,1  3372,2 
Italian dialects, etc. 1020,1  1299  2063,1  2122,1  3011-3014  3637,1  Vedi Toscano (Volgare). See Tuscan (vernacular).
People with defects are called for the most part by the name of their defect and why. 2441,1 
Moderate difficulty in writings, pleasurable. 2358,2 
Lack of self-confidence. 960,1  3188 [3186-90]  
Eolic digamma. 1127  1276,1  2070  2195,2  2321  2744  3169,2  3624,2  3698,1  3704,1  3731,4  3744,2  3756,3  3885,1  3988,2  4013,4  4014,3  4014,5  4030,5  4035,4  4036,3  4043,1  4044,4  4052,4  4054,2  4101,7  4126,10  4132,1  4146,8  4148,6  4158,5  4162,13  4180,1  4182,7  4248,3  4282,6  4290,2  Vedi Concorso delle vocali. F, lettera. V, Lettera. Sinizesi. Dittonghi. See Concurrence of vowels. The letter F. The letter V. Synizeses. Diphthongs.
Diminutives used as positives. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Diminutivi positivati. See separate slips entitled Positivized diminutives. 980,2  1504,1 [?]   2280,1  2286-2287  2663,5  2864,1  3040,2  3312,2  3477,3  3514,2  3515,1  3516,1  3557,2  3617,5  3621,2  3636,1  3684,2  3687,1  3694,2  3742,1  3751,1  3756,2  3811,2  3816,3  3821,1  3825,1  3834,2  3843,1  3844,1  3852,3  3863,1  3875,1  3886,1  3893,4  3894,3  3896,2  3902,2  3907,2  3907,4  3909,1  3937,2  3941,2  3955,2  3963,1  3967,2  3968,1.2.3  3975,1.2  3978,3  3980,1  3987,3  3989,3  3990,3  3992,4  3993,2.3.4.5  3995,1.2  3996,1.2  3996,5.6  3997,2  3998,1.2  4000,2  4002,2.3  4004,1.2.5  4005,1.3 e marg. [4005,2]   4006,5.6  4007,1.2.3.6  4008,2  4008,6  4009,1  4009,3  4010,4  4011,1  4012,3  4013,6  4014,4  4016,4  4017,5  4019,1  4019,3  4020,4  4020,5  4021,2  4021,4  4022,6  4024,1  4026,3  4029,5  4030,2  4030,8.9  4034,3  4034,5  4035,1  4036,7  4040,2  4040,4.5  4041,2.3  4041,5.6  4044,1  4046,8  4047,2  4048,4  4049,1  4050,1  4051,1  4052,2.3  4053,1  4053,4.5  4054,3  4054,5  4055,3  4061,2  4061,5  4068,6  4072,1  4073,3  4078,1  4082,1  4082,8 [4082,7]   4088,7  4089,3  4093,2  4095,1  4095,5  4101,3  4110,5  4111,2  4111,4  4112,3  4112,6  4113,4  4113,6  4114,1.2  4114,6  4114,10  4116,6  4117,3  4119,11  4120,10  4120,18.19  4121,2  4121,8  4121,12  4122,7  4122,16  4122,19  4123,2  4123,10.11  4124,3  4124,7.8  4125,2  4125,5  4125,11.12  4126,8  4127,6  4133,1  4134,3  4135,1  4136,2  4139,2  4139,7  4140,1  4140,6  4144,1  4144,2  4146,2  4146,4  4146,9  4147,5  4148,2.3.5.10  4149,3.4.5  4150,1.5.6.10  4151,3  4151,5  4152,2.3  4154,8  4154,10  4156,4  4157,6.7 [4157,5.6]   4160,1  4160,6  4162,9  4163,2  4164,12  4165,10.11  4166,1  4166,8  4166,15.16  4167,5 [?]   4168,1  4169,3  4170,2.6.7.11.13[]   4172,4  4172,11  4173,1  4173,6.7  4178,1  4180,2  4182,3  4188,3  4188,9  4190,2  4197,2  4201,7  4205,1  4210,5  4213,3  4227,1  4228,1 [4228,2]   4237,6  4238,1  4239,3  4245,5.6  4246,9  4246,14  4248,7  4251,2 [4251,1]   4257,1.2  4257,4  4257,8  4257,10  4259,3  4265,2  4268,5  4272,1  4273,3.4  4279,3  4281,2  4282,8  4283,5  4286,2  4293,3 
Law of the peoples, public, universal, etc. 2252,1  2305,1  2625,1  2644,1  2660,1.2  2759,2  3073,1  3115,1  3365,1  3420,1  4290,1 
Rights of princes to the throne. Legitimacy. 4137,2 
Ease, etc. in society; impossible for those who are reflective. 1062,2 
Despair. 1545,1-1547,1  107,1  188,1  1628,1  1653,2  1975,1,marg. 2107,1  2159,1  2217,1  2876,1  4079,1  4090,5  4272,2 
[Despair,] necessary to enjoy life. 2495,1 
True despair is not given in nature. 4145,4 
Calm and benevolent despair. 614,2  618,1.2  1653,2 
Vedi Rassegnazione. See Resignation.
Natural dispositions. Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Contempt towards others, in people in general, in authors, etc., even if justified, is usually a sign of small worth. 3720,1 
Diphthongs, Greek and Latin. 1159,1  1968,2  2247,2  2239,1 [2339,1]   2889,3  3684,6  3735,1  4103,3  4285,1  Vedi Sinizesi. Concorso delle vocali ec. See Synizeses. Concurrence of vowels.
Great difference, also physical, between humans. 868,1  1568,2  2479,2  2558,1  3466,1  3806,1 
[Great difference,] of an extremely sensitive man from himself in different ages and times. 4064,1 
Ancient divinities. The ancients did not debase divinity but rather elevated humanity, because they esteemed human things much more than Christianity does, etc. 3494,1  4048,3  4050,2  4076,3  4094,2  4110,3  4117,1  Vedi Démoni. Semidei. See Daemons. Demigods.
Pain. Vedi Piacere e Dolore. See Pleasure and Pain.
Pain of the ancients. 76,4  88,1  105,1.2  2434,2  2753,5  4156,8 
Natural pain of peasants, laborers, etc. 1677,1 
The venting of pain used by the ancients, by savages, countryfolk, etc.; how useful, how providentially willed by nature but stupidly prohibited by civilization and philosophy. 4243,8 
Pain of misfortunes, etc. is greater in more vigorous bodies. 2753-55  3922 
Pain of separation from the corpses of our loved ones. 3430,2 
Pains of the spirit. 512,1  715  931,1  2479,1 
Pains of the body. 2479,1  Many face the dangers of death, but very few face a sure pain of the body unnecessarily. 3432,1 
Donna, i.e. lady: the gallantry of this title, etc. 4053,3  4144,3 
Women. 676,3  678,1  1083,1  2258,1  2259,1  2481,2  3281,1  3291,1  3301,1  3553,2  3898,1  3926  3955,1  4092,1  4293,2  4294,5 
[Women,] mistreated by the ancient Greeks and Romans; under the Emperors were already an object of galantry. 4144,3 
Women, Great men, Men of letters, the common people, etc. are handled by means of exactly the same arts. 2155,4  2258,1  2568,1 
Drama. 810,1  2313,1  2361,1  2804,1  3042-44  3120  3122  3163-3166  3448,1  3482,1  3548,2  3095,2  3604,1  4234,5  4255,6  Vedi Commedia. Comici. Coro. Tragedie. Teatri ec. See Comedy. Comic writers. Chorus. Tragedies. Theaters, etc.
Doubt. Skepticism. 1392,1  1771,1  1655,2 
Du Cange. Note about his Latin Glossary, to be seen when it needs citing. 1504,1 
Two great poets or writers of the same genre are difficult to find in a single national literature. 801,1 

E (Inizio pagina)

Jews. Their language, literature, customs, laws, character, etc. 806-807  881-82  935  1229-30  1285,1  1441-1444  1710,1  1969,1  2005,1  2084-85  2253  2263,2  2404,1  2464  2615  2627  2909,2  2910,1  2912,1  2995,2  3022  3342-43  3902,4  3959  4152,4  4290,2 
Echo. 1929 
Making an exception (habit of), damaging to practical philosophy and to any discipline. 1866,2 
Editions, get better as style, etc. gets worse. 4268,7 
Educators, never persuade themselves that teaching cannot supplant experience in the young. 1939,1  Vedi Governanti. See Governors.
Egoism. 463,2  523,3  536,3  669,1  894,segg.  898  930,1  978,1  1100,1  1563,1  1594,2  1596,1  1648,1  1723,1  1724,1  1823,1  1824,2  1913,1  2273,marg. 2292,1  2429,1  2436,1  2473,1  2677,1  3107,1  3291,1  3314,1  3361,2  3435,1  3471,1  3480,1  4127,9 
[Egoism,] not unpleasant in the weak. 3555 
definition of egoism. 3291,1  3314,1  3361,2 
Vedi Compassione, Beneficenza. See Compassion, Benefaction.
Egoism of fear. Vedi Timore. See Fear.
Eloquence. 359,2 
Eloquence in Lyric poetry. 23,5 
Emulation, military, ancient and modern . 1842,1 
Encyclopedic. It is necessary to possess this quality in order to be perfect in any discipline. 1922,1 
Epithets in Homer. 1449,1  2791 
Reason for the epithet boȏpis [in Homer]. 2546,1 
Multiplying epithets without conjunctions. 2791 
Heroes. Heroism. 280,3  470,2  538  1563,1  2759,2 
Heroism. Heroic times. 23,4 
Inclination to heroism even in those most egoistic and cowardly. 3480,1 
Heroism of crime. 72,1  2481,3 
Errors. Misuse. The great discoveries, the great utility rendered by philosophers to humankind, consist for the most part in the destruction of errors or in the correction of misuses. 2705,3-2712,1 
Exercises of the body. 115,2  76,2  207,2  223,1  262,2  328,1  453,1  473,3  598,4  628  661,2  678,2  1633,1  1726,1  2204,1  2358,2  4289,1 
Exile. 1361,3 
Experience accustoms us to appreciate more than to disdain. 255,2  3545,1 
Experience of the world, necessary. 1586,1  2523,2  3440,1 
Age. Harm of knowing one's age. 102,1 
Etymologies (their study and science). 1263,2  1504,2  3621,3  3762,1  3831  3897,1  3940,1  3979,3  4160,2 
Etruscan (language). 1138,2  4152,4 
Euphemism of the ancients. 43,6 

F (Inizio pagina)

Mental faculties, etc. Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Childhood, the happiest age in nature, is necessarily the most tormented and unhappy in the civilized condition. 3078,1 
Children. 644,1  1062,2 [1063,1]   1103,1  1255,1  1262,2  1401,1  1464,1  1510,1  1553,1  1718,1  1725,2  1740,1  1770,3  1799,1  1904,2  1914,1  1930,2  1951,1  2043,1  2390,1  2596,1  3291,1  3345,1  3553,1 [3553,2]   3908,1  3950,4 [3950,2]   4038  4272,2  4280,1 
[Children.] Love to be treated like adults. 643,2  3480,1 
[Children.] How they arrive at forming their ideas of the beautiful and the ugly. 1183,2  1379,1  1510,1  1539,1  1718,1  1750,1  1794,2  1914,1  1930,2  1945,1  2965,1 
[Children.] Always inclined to the heroic. 3482,marg.
[Children.] Know and often discover great truths unknown to the philosophers. 2019,2  2037,1  2710-2712 
Children and Youths are generally inclined to destroy; the mature and the old to conserve. 4231,4 
Children's desires. 3446,1 
Children's distractedness. 2390,1  4026,6 
Fate. 90,1  222,1  503,1  4070,1  Vedi Necessità. See Necessity.
Tales and Stories for children. 1401,1 
Tales. Vedi Mitologie. See Mythologies.
Frederick II. Vedi Marcaurelio. See Marcus Aurelius.
Phaedrus. 3062,3  3626,segg. 
Happiness, considered a praise and a sign of divine favor by the ancients. 2457  3072,3  3097,2  3148,segg.  3342,1  4119,4  4240,1 
The happiness man desires, what is it. 3497,1  3509,1 
The greatest happiness of man. 2673,3  3895,1  4043,2 
Art of being happy: what it comes down to. 3846,1 [3846,2]   3895,1  4043,2 
Happiness, is always someone else's, and never belongs to anyone. 3745,2 
Happiness, impossible and nonexistent in the universe. 4137,1  4169,1  4174,1 [4174,2]   4191,5  4228,1 
How in my system of happiness the praise of life, activity, etc. is reconciled with, on the other hand, that of insensitivity, torpor, etc. My system is favorable to the spirit of energy and progress reigning today. 4185,2 
Future happiness in another world. 826,1  3497,1 
Folk festivals, ancient and modern, Jewish, Christian, etc. 60,1 [60,2]   1438,1  2255,1  2322,1 [2322,2]  
Firmness of character, is of two kinds. 3446,2 
Filicaia. 24,2  26,2  28,3 
Cicero's Philippics. 459,1  463,1 
Perfect philosophy and philosophy halfway. 520,1  1077,1  1252,2  1715,1  1792,1  2245,1  2292,1  2668,1  2672,3  2683,3 
Practical ancient philosophies. The meeting of their teachings and maxims and the agreement of their discordances in my philosophy. 4190,3 
Ancient and modern philosophers. 1018,1 
True and great philosopher, how difficult is for one to emerge. 1838,3  1858,2 
Philosophers can be original like poets. 1766,1 
Philosopher in theory, tends to have the most anti-philosophical nature in practice. 4160,10 
End, or Supreme good of man. Why so much disagreement about it among philosophers. 4168,3  4228,1 
The ends of nature, of man, of existence, etc., what they are 4127,9  4133,2  4168,3  4169,1  4174,1 [4174,2]   4228,1 
Ends. The usefulness of setting small and easy objectives to attend to daily. 4249,5 [4249,4]   4266,1 
Physical and Moral. The inappropriateness of this expression. 3745,2 [3747,1]  
Florus. 526,1 
Fortune.
Games of chance. 455,2 
Psychological reason behind the notion of Fortune and behind the complaints and hatred against it. 4070,1 
Vedi Natura e fortuna. See Nature and fortune.
Strength, boldness, poetic, etc. of the style, the languages, etc. of the ancients 1470,1  1988,1  2172,1  2239,2  2288,1  3567  3863,2 
Between, among, in between, within for in. 4122,13  4140,7  4259,4  4283,6  4287,6 
French (literature), does not belong to the family of the Greek, Italian, Latin, Spanish, but to another one. 3400,1 
French (language), frequent inappropriateness of its expressions. 3747,1 
French (pronunciation) destroys the original imitative sound of many words, Latin and non-Latin. 4280,4 
French (style) in general. 2613,1 
The French and the moderns do not have style. 2906,1  3428,1 
The French, cannot appreciate other languages well; learn them with difficulty; do not know other literatures, dead or living. 962,1  1001,2  1019,1 [1019,2]   1054,1  1796,1  1902,3  3672,2  3972,1 
Brothers, brotherly love, etc. 2862,1  3915,1  4226,4 
Frequentative and diminutive Latin, Italian, French verbs. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Frequentativi e diminutivi ec. latini - italiani - francesi. See separate slips, entitled Frequentatives and diminutives, etc. - Latin - Italian - French.
Latin frequentatives and diminutives, etc. 1111,1  1201,2  1504,1  1657,marg. 2009,1  2036,1  2194,2  2199,1  2225,1  2280,1  2285,1  2340,3  2809,1  2815,1  2819,1.2  2820,1.2.3  2821,marg. 3 2826,1  2835,1.2  2836,1  2842,1  2865,2  2924  2925,1  2930,1  2935,2  2972,1 [2972,2]   2974,1  2984,1 [2984,2]   2985,1  2986,1  2986,3  3021  3023,1  3032,1  3064,2  3071,1  3074,1  3182,1  3235,1  3246,2  3264,3  3283,1  3298,1.2  3298,4  3299,2  3350,3  3352,1  3234,1 [3234,2]   3477,1  3491,2  3514,1.2  3541,1  3542,2  3543,1  3557,1  3568,1 [3568,3]   3570,1  3584,3 [3584,4]   3618,4  3624,1  3629,1  3630,2  3631,1  3684,2  3686,3  3687,2  3693,1  3695,2  3710,1.2  3711,2  3731,4  3732,1  3735,2  3736,2  3761,3  3764,5 [3764,4]   3810,1  3815,1  3815,4  3821,1  3826,3  3828,3.4  3834,1  3834,4  3849,1  3869,1  3893,4  3894,1  3897,2  3897,3  3900,1  3900,2  3907,4  3928,2  3928,3  3937,2  3938,5  3942,1  3955,2  3968,1  3984,1  3968,3  3986,2  3992,2  3996,5.6  4004,2  4004,6  4005,2  4006,4  4002,3  4008,6  4013,2.3  4014,4 [4014,5]   4014,7  4021,4  4022,5  4024,1  4025,2  4025,5  4030,8  4037,3  4040,3  4041,2.3  4041,5  4042,4  4044,5  4045,1  4046,8  4048,1  4048,5  4050,4  4050,8  4051,1  4052,1  4053,5  4056,1  4056,3  4068,2  4072,1  4075,1  4081,3  4086,1.2  4087,3  4087,5  4088,4  4089,3  4089,6  4093,6  4105,1  4112,2.7[4112,3]   4112,6  4114,2  4114,5  4117,2.3  4118,8  4119,1  4120,5  4121,13  4122,5  4122,6  4122,11  4123,1  4123,5  4134,2  4146,1  4147,1  4148,2  4148,7  4149,1  4150,3  4150,8  4151,1  4151,8  4151,10  4154,5  4154,9  4156,3  4158,5  4160,9  4165,11  4166,1  4166,7  4166,10  4166,15  4167,1  4170,2  4170,9  4172,1  4173,1  4177,5  4182,3  4182,5  4188,11  4196,1.2  4197,4  4201,2  4201,4  4217,2  4224,2  4237,6  4239,4  4241,1  4254,2.3  4257,4  4257,8  4268,3  4272,3  4287,5  4287,7 
Fronto. A philosophical passage of his, noted, etc. 542,2  752-757  3627 
Frottole. Vedi Burchiellesco. See Burchiellesque genre.
Fire (use of). 723,1  3643,1  4119,2  4121,7 
Cleverness. Malice. 2259,1  3945,1 

G (Inizio pagina)

Galileo. His manner of writing and thinking seems to reflect the nobility of his birth, education, etc. Various applications of this observation. 4241,3 
Genius. Vedi Gusto. See Taste.
Genitive used instead of the accusative or nominative, etc. in Greek, Italian, French, etc. 3560,2  3907,1  4012,2  4035,2  4125,3  4125,10  4146,3  4160,7  4162,3  4162,11  4163,10  4179,1  4200,3  4227,5  4229,1 
Parents. Their first duty is to console their children and to give them courage to live. 2607,1 
Parents. Paternal house. Domestic life. 4226,4  4229,4 
Gestures. 68,1  141,1.3[142,2]   206,3  1607,1 
Gestures in reciting or reading; passages that can hardly be read without making gestures. 4222,1 
Garden. Wretched spectacle of a garden which under the appearance of joy is a veritable hospital with suffering creatures. 4175,4 
Young people. Vedi Fanciulli e Giovani. See Children and Young people.
[children and young people] are incapable of boredom proper: their boredom is a more intense suffering. 3879,1 
Sensitive youths, offended by life in their self-love from the start, choose deadest living possible; and old in their youth, they are young in their old age. 3837,1  4103,6 
Youths 25 years of age. 4141,3 
Games, funerary. 2943,1 
Greek games and Roman games. 328,1  453,1  3764,2  4047,1  4109,4 
Glory. Fame. 127,1  128,1  130,2  131,1  3027,2  3952,1  4153,5  4269,2 
Literary glory. Those who seek it spend their youth in the hope to enjoy when the time for enjoyment has passed. 4268,2 
Governors, Educators, etc. always complained of by their subjects and accused of their ills: the psychological reason for this. 4070,1 
Greatness that ancient languages and styles seem to communicate to human affairs. 2025,1 
Greatness and Perfection. 470,2  661,3 
Ancient and modern Greeks. Their tenacity in keeping their own customs, language, religion, etc. 1590,1  2589,1  2694,1  2731,1 [2731,2]   2793,2  2829,1  3371,2  3580,segg.  4237,2 
Greeks, ignorant of Latin, etc. 981,1  988,1  999,2  1024,1  1025,1  1029,1  1052,2  1093,1  1363,1 [1363,2]   1518,1  2312,3  2402,1  2450  2589,1  2624,marg. 3371-3372  4173,8  4211,7  4237,2  4243,3 
[The Greeks,] loved Greece all together as their homeland. 2628,1 
Greek writers of the middle ages, etc. 2793,2  3421 4026,7 
Greek (language), would be of great benefit had it taken, and if it were to hold, the place of Latin in Europe. 1973,1  2025,1  2089  2170,1  2210,1  2212,1  2619,1  2635,1 
[Greek (language),] perhaps more modern than Latin; certainly with origins that are more difficult to trace. 2138,2  2307,1  2329,1  2369,1  2572,1  2771,2 [2771,3]   2779,2  2812-13  2882,1  3284,2  3541,3  3762,2  3902,3  3938,4  3940,2  4007,4  4030,7  4040,3  4042,4  4045,1  4048,1  4048,5  4050,4  4086,4  4089,2  4096,1  4123,1  4154,9  4155,1  4268,3  Vedi Latina (lingua): osservazioni archeologiche ec. See Latin (language): archeological observations, etc.
Greek, ancient common and vulgar. 2811,2  4147,6 
Modern Greek. 2829,1 
Guidi. 27,1  28,3 
Taste. Genius. 1187,segg.  1646,1 

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Ideas, how closely they are linked to words. 2487,1  2584,1  2591,1  2658,2  2948,1  4214,4  4233,1  4181,1 
Abstract ideas. Words that signify them, etc. 1388,1  4233,1  4181,1 
Plato's eternal ideas. 1712,1 
Physical ideas are admittedly not innate: why should the moral and abstract be? 4253,3 [4253,2]  
How children acquire their ideas. 4253,2 
Ideas people have of any one thing are never identical in any two individuals or nations. 1706,1 
Ideology. 1608,1  2335,1  2707-708 
Ideas, associated to the main ones, in the meaning of words. 1701,1  1777,2  1962,1  2041,1  2468,1  2594,1  3952,1  4117,11 
Idylls. 57,2  2361,1 
Ignorance. Vedi Scienza e Ignoranza. See Knowledge and Ignorance.
Poetic imitation, etc. 1302,1  1303,1  1991,1  2857  4235 
Imitation of passion and action in the fine arts. 2361,1 
Imitations. Vedi Continuazioni. See Continuations.
Imagination. 666,2  1045,1  1448,1  2132,1  Vedi Ragione e Immaginazione. See Reason and Imagination.
Strong imagination and Fertile imagination. 152,2  211,3 
Imagination and feeling. 703,4  724,3  1448,1  1860,1  3154,1 
Imagination, the extent to which it serves philosophy. 1650,1  1833,2  1975,1  2019,2  2132,1  3237,1  3245,1  3269,1  3382,2  3881,4 
Imagination of children.> Vedi Fanciullezza. See Childhood.
Imaginations of ancients and children. 57,3 
Immortality of the soul. 601,4  826,1  1615,2  3027,2  4277,1 
Learning. Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Impatience. Vedi Iracondia. See Anger.
Impatience to attain some end, increased by uncertainty. 369,1 
Emperors among the Romans, why this title instead of that of Kings. 2487,1 
Imposture, necessity, etc. 1787,3 
Inaction. Quiet and inactive life. Passage from Aristophanes, can serve as an epigraph to my writings in favor of activity. 684,2 
Inaction. Man never gets used to it. 1988,3 
Civilizing process. Vedi Civiltà. See Civilization.
Inclination to measure others acording to oneself. 1572,3  1903,2 
[Inclination] to suppose greater wisdom, worth and ability in someone else rather than in oneself, in order to be able to entrust oneself and rest in the other's authority. 4229,4 
Man's inclinations are more numerous and lively the closer he is to his natural condition; to the contrary his Faculties. 2046,1 
Accidental inconveniences in nature. 1079,1  1530,2  1789,2  1959,1  2599,1  3374,1  3792  3883  4248,9 
Incredulity, is not a sign of great talent or knowledge. 539,1  1055,3  1391,1  1392,1 
Religious incredulity. 1059,2 
Indifference. 69,3  381-2  448-50  484  2601  3942,2 
Unhappiness, was considered a blame and a sign of wickedness and of divine hatred among the ancients. 2463,2  3342,1  4021,1  4078,2  4088,2  4166,3  4188,6  4213,2  4248,2 
One's own unhappiness. Should not be shown off. 2401,3 
Human unhappiness (its proofs). 1974,1  2410,1  2549,1  2796,1  2861,1  2883,1  3622,1  4138,2  4167,12  4191,5  4287,1 
[Human unhappiness (its proofs).] A moral proof. 4283,8 
Infinite. The world is not infinite: from the existence of the world cannot be deduced that of an infinite Being. 4141,4  4274,3  4292,1 
The infinitive, used instead of the imperative by the Greeks. 2686,3  3967,1  4087,7 
Influence of the body on the spirit. 1719,1  3197,1 
Intellect. Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Offense. 829,1 
The English. Their poetry, literature, language, character, etc. 986,2  1011,2  1028,5  1043,1  1045,2  1048  1420,1  1850  1954-1956  2062,1  2084  2399  2875,1  3366,1  3400,1  3816,5  4031,1  4183  4261,2  Vedi Ossian. Byron. Celtica (lingua). See Ossian. Byron. Celtic (language).
Interesting example of the English way of pronouncing Latin. 4273,2 
Innocent. 51,4  Wicked. 276,1  710,1 
Teaching. Vedi Educazione. See Education.
Insensitivity. Vedi Compassione, Beneficenza. See Compassion, Beneficence.
Impatience, intolerance, in society. 3684,1 
Interest on behalf of others, has no place in those who are without hope, etc. 1589,1  3836,1  4105,2  4283,2  Vedi Compassione, Beneficenza. See Compassion, Beneficence.
Interest in poetry, etc. 3095,2  3482,1  3590,1  3768,1  4255,6 
Moral intermittence. 4231,2 
Intolerance. Vedi Insofferenza. See Impatience.
Plot in dramas, poems, etc. 2313,1  3164  3165-66  3549 
Invention. Faculty of invention. 1661,1  1697,1  2132,1 
Invention in poetry and fine arts. 257,2 
Inventions and discoveries of the advanced sciences, much less great, important and difficult than the ancient ones. 2605,1 
If inventions and civilization continue to progress, as seems likely, people a thousand years from now will not understand how we could live, just like we do not understand how primitive people used to live, without fire, navigation, etc. 4198,1 
Winter, summer. The latter is more discontent etc., the former more resigned. 2926,3  3347,1  3676,1  4250,1  4282,10  Vedi Primavera See Spring.
Envy felt by the divinities towards human prosperity, according to the ancients. 2365,2  2388  2683,2  3342,1  3638,3  Vedi Cristianesimo, insegna la nullità della vita. See Christianity, teaches the nullity of life.
Anger, impatience, to what extent changeable with habit. 2491,1 
Irresolution. 245,1  538,1  539,1  595,2  1998,1  2391,1  2529  3040,1 
Lack of reflection. Vedi Riflessione. Uomini riflessivi. See Reflection. Reflective individuals.
Inspire. Typical human desire to inspire something of oneself in spectators or listeners. 4284,1 
Instinct. 436,1 
Italy. Its state, customs, etc., ancient and modern 1092,1  2609,1  2628,1  3129,marg. 3471,1  3855,1  4031,1  4053,3  4261,2  4265,1  4267,2 
[Italy.] Does not have customs, but habits. 2923,1 
Each Italian has his own social tone. 3546,1 
Italian (language and literature). Vedi Letteratura italiana. Lingua italiana. See Italian literature. Italian language.
Itineraries. Descriptions of cities and provinces. Reports of journeys, etc. by the ancient Greeks. 4294,4 

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Lamias (Enchantresses). For the ancients, witches; for our 14th century writers, nymphs, etc. 2299,2  2703,1 
Latin language. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Latina (lingua), Osservazioni grammaticali, archeologiche ec. See separate slips entitled Latin (language), Grammatical, archeological, etc. observations. 1104,1  1504,1  1970,3  1972,1  2138,2  2195,2  2221,2  2236,1  2257,1  1970,3  2266  2277,3  2297,1  2306,1  2316,1  2329,1  2339,1  2369,1  2442,2  2475,1  2572,1  2588,2  2649,1  2656,1  2657,1  2656,marg. 2658,1  2659,1  2757,2  2771,1  2771,2 [2771,3]   2779,2  2811,marg. 2811,3  2813,1  2826,1  2844-2845  2879,1  2882,1  2889,2  2894,1  2895,1  2923,3  2996,1  3001,3  3080,1  3095,1  3246,1  3284,2  3344,1  3350,1  3359,1  3372,2  3541,3  3542,1  3547,1.2  3569,2  3572,1  3586,1  3617,2  3620,2  3621,3  3626,segg.  3684,6  3698,1  3704,1  3711,2  3715,1  3723,1  3731,4  3732,2  3752,1  3756,3  3762,1  3762,2  3811,1  3818,1  3830,2  3834,1  3834,4  3843,2  3845,1.2  3849,3  3852,5  3853,1  3886,1.2  3901,3  3904,5  3940,2  3941,1  3956,1  3964,2  4001,2  4007,4  4013,2  4023,2  4030,7  4037,4  4040,3  4042,4  4044,5  4045,1  4048,1  4048,5  4050,4  4050,8  4086,4  4088,4  4089,2  4090,6  4093,6  4096,1  4112,2  4112,7 [4112,3]   4117,11  4123,1  4150,8  4154,9  4155,1  4160,2  4217,2  4251,3 [4251,2]   4268,3  4273,2  4280,4  4284,2  4294,1 
Latin language after the resurgence of literary studies; the harm and delay of the progress of human spirit; the need to apply spoken languages to the study of literature. 3336,1  3338,1  Vedi Greca (lingua) See Greek (language).
Latin (prose and poetry), was more daring and poetic than the Greek. 2239,2 
Latins. Vedi Romani. See Romans.
Italian latinists of the 16th century, etc. 1023,2  1066,2  1973,1  3024,2  3336,1  3338,1  4240,2 
Late Latin has much to offer the Italian language. 952,1 [953,1]   1031,1  1317,1  1222 
Laws of nature in physics, etc. are just the facts we know. The realm of possibility is much greater than is believed. 4189,1 
Legitimacy. Vedi Diritti dei principi. See Rights of princes.
Literature. Vedi Scrivere e Operare. See Writing and Doing.
[Literature.] The moderns cannot properly speaking have any. 1174,2  1253,1  1383,1  2067,1  2906,2  2944,1 
Modern literature. Notable observations on the nullity of style today, the impossibility of becoming immortal through literature, etc. Passages by Pope, Buffon, etc. 4267,3  4268,7 
The greatest works of every literature were written when the nation did not yet have a literature. 4257,5 
Italian literature. Foreign opinions about it. 653,1  970-972  974-975  1003  2312,3  2648,1  3884,1  4234,3  4237,4  4249,1  4267,1 [4267,2]   Vedi Lingua italiana. See Italian language.
Biblioteca italica, a French journal in Geneva from the beginning of the last century. 4234,3 
Present-day Italian literature and language. Sorry condition of a true man of letters in Italy, for whom Italy needs a modern language. Reflections on the matter. 3318,1  3830,1  3855,1 
Letters. Names of the letters of the alphabet. 30,2  69,4  802,2 [812,1]   1164,1  1338,3  1346,3  4082_4  Vedi Alfabeto. See Alphabet
Letters (power of). 455,2 
Letters and language, flourish together and become corrupt together. 3398-3399 
The letters compared to friends: they are good company until you start expecting something useful from them. 4268,2 [4268,1]  
Vedi Scienze e Lettere See Sciences and Letters.
Reading. 222,2  1574,1  2228,1  4266,1 
Liberalism, is not modern. 1100,2 
Freedom in languages. Freedom in the use of one's own language. 704,1  708  764,1  788,segg.  794  797-800  985,1  1046,2  1067,2  1093,1  1098,2  1292,1  1332,1  1862,1  1899,1  1953,2  2014,1  2057,1  2068,1  2103,1  2126,1  2130,1.2  2166,1  2173,3  2180,1  2397,2  2415,3  2578,1  2634-35  2845,1  3256,1  Vedi Novità nelle lingue. See Novelty in languages.
Beautiful books and useful books. 949,1  1165,1  1312,2 
Philosophical books. 347,1 
Language. A single one at first, then divided. Philosophical history of languages. 1263,2  2037,1  2694,1  3247,1  3668,1  3672,1 
Difficulties in the first invention of language and of speaking. 2895,2 
The nature of the sounds of a language corresponds to the nature of that language. 2990  3247,1 
Difficulties of owning and using perfectly one's native language. 4082,2 
Vedi Lettere e lingua See Letters and language.
Italian language, previousy studied by foreigners, etc. 653,1  990,1  1581,3  3066,1  3070,1  4234,3  4237,4  4243,2  Vedi Letteratura italiana. See Italian literature.
[Italian language,] disdained by the learned in the 14th, 15th and 16th centuries. 2693,2  3741,1 
[Italian language,] was never applied to its own modern philosophy. 1316,1. 
Vedi Letteratura e lingua italiana See Italian literature and language.
Language for literature, and language for philosophy, separate, proposed to Italy. 1356,2 
Poetic language, what it consist in, etc. 3008,1 [3009,1]   3413,1  3633,1  3749  3864-65  4214,3 
Universal language. 936,2  1022,1  3972,1  4108,2  1028,3  3253,1  3254,1  Vedi Universalità delle lingue. See Universality of languages.
Language, cause of man's superiority over animals. 1102,1 
Influence of language on the process of civilization. 936,1 
Invention of language. 1086,1 
Languages, spread over a small area. 932,1  1020,1  1022,1  1053,1  1065,3  1459,1  1629,1  1755,1  1965,2  3254,1  3932,1  Vedi Dialetti See Dialects.
[Languages.] Knowing many helps with thinking. 94,1  1728,2  2212,1  2231,2 
Who could speak two languages was once considered wondrous. 4173,8 
[Languages.] Are easier to understand in the earliest authors. 2112,1 
Ancient languages, much more daring than the modern. 2172,1 
Beauty of languages is none other than boldness. 2415,3 
Lyrcal poetry. 23,5  28,3  245,2  1057-58  1856  2049,1  2172,1  2361,1  2533,1  3046  3228  3269,1  4234,5 
Livy. Vedi Tacito. See Tacitus.
Praise. 196,1 [196,2]   724,2 
One easily becomes insensitive to the pleasure of praise; not so to the displeasure of criticism. 4167,12 
Praise of oneself. 926,1  1740,1  1932,2 
[Praise of oneself,] necessary. 2429,1 
Longinus. 845-848  997  1495  2632  4027 
Light. Its material influence on the spirit and the imagination. 3387 

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A "good" magistrate, etc. is a synonym for "disinterested". Observations about that. 4247,1 
Magnanimity. 829,1 
Diseases, bodily weakness, etc. are products of civilizing and of the cultivation of the mental faculties. 1597,1  1631,2  1699,2  1775,1  1803,1  2544,1  2454,2  2686,1  3058,3  3179,1  3568,1  3643,1  4025,1 
Ills. Usefulness of and reason for the ills in nature. 2599,1  2661,1 
Melancholy. 142,1  460,1  931,1  1690,1  1860,1 
[Melancholy,] the usual effect of music. 2310,1 [3310,1]  
[Melancholy,] wherever it does not reign in modern poetry and literature is because of the weakness of intellect of the authors. 2363,2 
Malice. Cunning. 2259,1  3945,1 
Wicked. Vedi Innocente. See Innocent. 276,1  710,1 
Manfredi. His lyric poetry. 28,1 [28,2]  
Marcus Aurelius. 2295 
[Marcus Aurelius.] Why he wrote his book in Greek. 2166,1  2624 
Marcus Aurelius and Frederick: a comparison of ancient and modern philosophy on the throne. 4096,3 
Martyrs. Vedi Spartani. See Spartans.
Marriage. 283,1 
Morning. 151,3 
Medicine. 1980,1.2  4136 
Human mind. Its highest power, especially in abstract speculations. 1627,2  2941,1  3171,1 
Lie. Lying. 2386,2 
Southern. Vedi Caratteri meridionali. Settentrionale. Orientali. See Southern natures. Northern. Oriental.
Metastasio. 701  3949,2 
Method, loved by children and by men of imagination. 211,3  212,2  1588,1  4259,5 
[Method, loved] by the desperate who have become resigned. 620 
[Method, loved] by everyone. 298-299 
[Method, loved] by the solitary, and all the more the less one is occupied or entertained. 3410,1 
[Method,] harmful to the tranquility of life, etc. 4259,5 
Military men and nations, attracted to women, to love affairs, to compassion. 3765,1 
Human aims extend further the less lifespan one can expect to have, and vice versa. 3265,1 
Misanthropy. Destroyed by a smile, by a kind gesture. 1727,2 
It is inevitable to become either misanthropes or egoists. 1913,1 
Greek mythology. 52,1  68,2  285,2  1831  3430,2  3461,1  3638,3  3644  3771  4001,1  3878,1  4048,3  4238,4 
Mythologies, Symbols, etc. Their origin and cause, etc. 2940-41  3430,2  3638,3  3644  3811,4  3878,1  4001,1  4070,1  4238,4 
Difference between ancient and modern mythologies. 4238,4 
This century's fashion of philosophizing. 31,1 
[This century's fashion] of speaking and studying politics. 309,4  574-75 
Modesty, proper to great individuals. 612,3  4285,5 
Multiplicity and complication of causes in all natural things, and of accidents that vary their effects, etc. The sciences, both moral and physical, cannot do without suppositions and hypotheses. 3977,1 
Monads of Leibniz. 1635,2 
Monarchy and Republic. 302,2  523,3  543,1  579,2  590,1  671  683,1  120,1  709,1  902,segg.  911,1  930,2  1563,1  1586,1  3082,1  3411,1  3471,1  3889,1  Vedi Costituzioni. See Constitutions.
World in the sense of the Gospel. 112,2  191,2 
World, mocks those who actually observe their duties, and criticizes those who do not do so outwardly. 2342,1 
Clean and foul, relative. 1368,1  1568,1  3760,1 
Money. 1170,1 
Monophagous. Monophagy. Infamous among the ancients. Its defense. 4183,2 
Monosyllables. Languages were originally composed of these alone. Latin, etc. monosyllables 1128,1  2879,1  2972,1  3006,2  3246,1  3541,3  3547,1.2  3621,1  3684,4  3722,3  3830,1  3849,2  3881,2.3  3896,3  3902,3  3938,4  4139,8 
Monotony. 345,1  368,1  1588,1  1655,1  1736,1  3676,1  Vedi Varietà. See Variety.
Montesquieu. Comments on his work on the greatness and decadence of the Romans. 113,1  113,3  114,1  116,4  117,1.2  119,2  120,1.2  121,1.2  122,1  123,2  124,1  299,1  222,3  358,2  457,1  883  915,segg.  1601  1606,1 [1606,2]  
Monti (Vincenzo). 13,3  36,1  701  725  3418  3477,4 
Practical morality, greater among the ancients, etc. to the same extent that theoretical Morality is greater among the Christians, etc. 2492,2  3134,1  Vedi Doveri morali. See Moral Duties.
Moral. Vedi Fisico e Morale. See Physical and Moral.
Moors in Spain. 3579,1 
White Moors, or Albinos, also known by the ancients. 4125,1  4206,1 
Mortality and Vitality in ancient and in modern states. 625,3  1330,1  4062,5 
Death. Desire for death. 66,1 
[Death,] believed by Diogenes to be not felt. 660,1 
[Death,] is not painful. 2182,1 
[Death,] always believed to be far away, etc. 2638,1 
Pain caused by the death of our dear ones or of people we know, what is its reason. 4277,1 
Total mortification of feeling, of imagination and of every capacity, caused in people, especially sensitive ones, by the habitual unhappiness and by the resigned deprivation of all hope. 4105,2 
Municipal, provincial, etc. (spirit). 2628,1 
Musicians, ancient and modern. 3224-3229  3424-3425 
Musicians were in ancient times the poets themselves. 3228-3229 
Mutability, proper to great minds. 1450,1 
Change in the spirit of every man with age, corresponds to that of nations with the passing of centuries, and vice versa. 1313,1 [1315,1]  

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Napoleon (his government). 229,2  251,1 
Nature. Passage from Cicero about it, which can serve as an epigraph to my books. 599,1.  another one 601,1.  another one by Xenophon 2204,1.  another one by St. Athanasius 2645,1. 
System of nature. It really is quite poetic. 1833,2  3237,1 
Vedi Artifizio. Contraddizioni e mostruosità. Semplicità. Moltiplicità. ec. See Artifice. Contradictions and monstrosities. Simplicity. Multiplicity.
Wild nature and cultivated nature. 1558,2  2250,1 
Nature and fortune; providence and art. 542,2  1022,1  1329,3  1558,2 
Naturalness. 658,1  650,1  705  1329,3  1365,1  1404,1  1411,1  1915,1  2037,2  2498,1  2545,1  2682,1  3047,1  3050,1  3490,1  Vedi Semplicità. See Simplicity.
Naturalness and Clarity in writing. 119,1 
[Naturalness and Clarity in writing] can only be attained by means of art. 3047,1  3050,1 
Nations. Their common origin. 1263,2 
Necessity. Consolation born from thinking about it. 65,1  188,2  503,1  2419,2  2674,2  Vedi Fato. See Fate.
Negligence, Inactivity; Diligence, Activity (the habit of). 1075,2  1584,2  1588,1  4254,4 
Those who do more have more time and desire to do; those who do less, less. Application to men of letters, to businessmen, to the ancients. Notable observations. 4254,4  4281,3 
Nihil. Its etymology. 2306,1  3897,1  3979,3 
Nn modified into gn. 928,1  4068,7  4085,3  4104,1  4234,2 
Names of ordinal and cardinal numbers. 1073,1 
Names of just and wicked persons in various languages. 64,3  2316,1  2486,1  4013,1  4227,6  4229,3  4268,6 
Names. Why people let themselves be governed by names. 2487,1 
Novelty, pleasurable in itself. 1866,1 
Continuous novelty becomes monotony. 1655,1 
Vedi Monotonia. Varietà. See Monotony. Variety.
Novelty in the Italian language: Latinisms, Grecisms, Spanishisms, etc. Rules and ways of using them. 3404,1  3866,1 
Nothingness or smallness of things. Things are not actually nothing or small in themselves, but rather for us. 2936,1  2938,1  2941,1  3956,3 
Rhythm, varies in the various centuries of every literature; in changing, it changes the language and style, etc. Considerations on Rhythm. 4026,7  2793,2  2827,1  Vedi Armonia. See Harmony.
Numbers. Vedi Nomi dei numeri. Quantità. Cifre numeriche. See Names of the numbers. Quantity. Numeric figures.

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O, U, letters. Often interchangeable in Latin, in Italian, etc. 2195,1  2325,1  2779  3574-3575  3701,marg. 3816,2  3872,1  3992,1 
Eyes. Vedi Fisonomia, Occhi. See Physiognomy, Eyes.
[Eyes.] Why it is customary to close those of the dead. 2102,1 
Smells. The sense of smell. 1537,1  1803,1  1940,1 
Homicide. 3928,5 
Honor. Ancient and modern principle of honor. 1842,1  2420,1 
Honors, posts, ranks. 334,1 
Doing. Vedi Scrivere. See Writing.
Opinions (their variety). 364,1  668,1 [667-68]  
[Opinions.] Their influence on actions, tastes, feelings, etc. 1733,1  1749,1  1801,1  1865,1  2596,1  3151-3152  3909,2  3914,1 
Human love of opinions. 1816,2  2624,3 
Horace. 2043  2049,1 
Orientals. 926,1 [926,2]   950,1  986,2  1285,1  1830,1  1846,1  1823,1  2007  2173,1  2404,1  2615  2746,1  3543,2  3959  4290,2 
[Orientals,] probably the first civilized people. 2500,1 
[Orientals.] Their life and that of southerners, shorter and more intense than that of others; preferable in terms of happiness. 4062,5 
Vedi Bibbia. Ebrei ec. See Bible. Jews, etc.
Originality. 128,2  143,1  307,2  470,2  724,3  2184,1 
Hospitality. 2254,1  4286,1 
Ossian. Bards. 204,2  484,1  931,2  986,2  994-995  1218  1399,1  3401  Vedi Celtica (lingua) See Celtic (language)
Obstinacy. 1970,2 

P (Inizio pagina)

Pallavicino (Sforza). 4028 
Paradoxes. 1329,2  1347,1  1507,1  2157,1  2666,1  262,3  2803,1  3349,marg. 3956,3  4043,2  4096,2  4174,2  4182,9  4199,1  4204,1  Vedi Costumi antichi ec See Ancient customs.
Paragrandines and lightning rods among the ancients. 4199,1 
Parini. 701  2363,2  3418 
Talking to oneself. 153,1  393,1 
Participles, etc. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Participii usati per aggettivi. Participii in us de' verbi attivi o neutri. See separate slips, entitled Participles used as adjectives. Participles in "us" of active or neutral verbs.
Participles used as adjectives. 1938,1  2138,1  2340,marg. 2757,2  2917,1  2918,1  2974,3  3023,1  3026,1  3060,4  3299,1  3477,2  3569,1  3620,1  3695,3  3722,marg. 3731,1  3731,3  3772,1  3810,1.2.3  3815,5  3828,1  3834,3  3851,2  3897,3  3928,1  3938,3  3949,3.4  3960,3  3970,2  3980,3  3992,5  3996,3.4  3998,4  4005,5  4006,2.3  4007,5  4008,5  4010,1  4011,3  4015,2  4016,3  4017,4  4018,2  4019,2  4021,3  4022,4  4024,4  4033,3  4036,4  4037,5  4040,7  4042,3  4046,1  4046,6  4053,6  4053,8  4054,4  4056,2  4062,4  4067,1  4068,1  4068,5  4069,1  4076,1  4088,1  4088,3  4093,5  4094,1  4099,1  4101,4  4101,10  4102,2  4103,4  4104,5  4111,1  4112,1  4112,4.5  4112,8  4113,2  4114,4  4115,4  4116,4.5  4117,7  4118,1  4118,14  4119,6  4120,4  4120,11  4121,1  4121,5  4121,9  4121,14  4122,4  4122,9.10  4122,15  4123,6.7  4123,8  4126,4  4126,7  4126,9  4127,1  4127,3  4127,8  4134,1  4139,9.10.11  4140,3  4141,2  4146,6.7  4147,3.4  4150,4  4150,9  4150,12  4151,7  4155,2  4157,3.4[4157,4.5]   4158,3  4160,3  4161,1  4162,1  4162,2  4162,4  4162,10  4163,1  4163,4  4163,6  4163,7  4164,1  4164,4  4164,9  4164,11  4165,1  4165,7 [4165,6]   4165,12  4166,6  4166,12  4166,14  4167,4  4167,11  4168,2  4169,2  4170,1  4170,4  4170,8  4170,12  4170,16  4172,6  4173,2  4173,4.5  4177,1  4179,2  4182,2  4190,1  4190,4  4191,3  4197,3  4200,1  4200,4  4201,3  4228,2 [4228,3]   4237,5  4239,2  4241,4  4245,2  4246,3  4246,5  4246,13  4248,8  4249,2  4254,1  4255,1  4257,3  4257,7  4259,1  4274,1  4279,2  4282,1.2  4282,4  4283,7  4285,2  4287,3.4  4288,1 
Ancient passions, not all were more vehement than the modern. 2434,2 
Patents of inventions. Vedi Brevetti. See Patents.
Homeland. How important that it should be large. 1715,2 
Patience. 112,3  302,4  3602  3608  3612  4164,2 
[Patience.] Its usefulness when suffering or in trouble, etc. 4239,5 
Pederasty. 1840,1  1841,1  4047,1 
Pain felt in leaving a person, a place, etc. forever. 644,1  2242,1 [2242,2]   4278,2 
Regret. 188,2  65,1  466,1  476,1  1400,1 
Regret and Repentance for faults among the ancients. 2354,1 
Perfectibility or Human perfection. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Perfettibilità o Perfezione umana. See separate slips, entitled Perfectibility or Human perfection. 222,3  371,1  376,1  387-388  391,1  393,1  655,1  830,1  940  1096,1  1170,1  1452,1  1558,2  1569,2  1570,1  1572,1  1597,1  1611,1  1612,2 [1612,1]   1618,1  1630,2  1691,2  1699,2  1737,2  1775-76  1858,2  1838,3  1907,2  1923,1  1952,1  1957,2  1959,1  1959,2  1960,1  2114,1  2152,1  2268,1  2270,1  2337,2  2390,1  2391,1  2392,2  2410,1  2479,1  2493,1  2563,2  2567,1  2602,2  2606,1  2644,1  2645,1  2895,2  3078,1  3082,1  3179,1  3374,1  3643,1  3773,1  3957,1  3973,1  4041,7  4135,5  4166,4  4180,4  4185,2  4265,4 
Perfection. Vedi Grandezza e Perfezione. Precisione e perfezione. See Greatness and Perfection. Precision and Perfection.
Absolute perfection. The most perfect being. God. 1339,1  1341,1  1355,1  1461,1  1469,1  1613,1  1619,1  1625,1  1627,1.2  1637,1  1645,1  1710,1  1712,1  1790,1  1791,2  1907,2  2073,1  2178,1  2232,2  2263,2  2395,1  3760,1  4142,1  4204,1  4248,9  4257,11  4274,3  Vedi Infinito. See Infinite.
Persians. Their language, etc. 954  2479,2 
Pleasure (its Theory). Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Piacere, Teoria del piacere. See separate slips, entitled Pleasure, Theory of pleasure. 165,1  185,1  188,4  191,3  198,1  206,4  212,3  221,1  239,1  246,2  383-385  388,1  472,2  514,1  532,1 [532,2]   610,1  646,2  826,1  986,1  1017,1  1025,1 [1025,2]   1028,1  1044,2  1382,1.2  1429,1  1430,1  1464,1  1472,2  1507,2  1534,1  1537,1  1554,2  1573,1  1580  1584,1.2  1628,1  1684,1  1716,2  1744,1  1777,2  1779,1  1789,1  1798,3.4  1825,2  1826,2  1827,2  1866,1  1915,1  1927,2  1930,1  1944  1953,1  1962,1  1967,1  1982,2  1987,1  1999,1  2017,3  2041,1  2053,1  2118,1  2153,2  2251,1  2257,2  2263,1  2336,1  2337,1  2350,1  2361,1  2410,1  2433,1  2468,1  2493,2  2495,1  2496,1  2499,1  2526,1  2549,1  2592,2  2599,1  2629,1.2.3  2645,2  2661,1  2673,3  2685,2  2736,1  2759,1  2861,1  2883,1  3191,1 [3191,2]   3497,1  3509,1  3525,2  3553,1 [3553,2]   3617,4  3622,1  3745,2  3764,2  3813,1  3822-23  3835,1  3842,2  3846,2  3854,2  3876,1  3879,1  3895,1  3909,1 [3909,2]   3921,1  3952,1  4021,7  4043,2  4060,1  4103,6  4126,3  4127,9  4133,2  4185,2  4191,5  4228,1  4286,6  4293,2  4293,4 
In time of pleasure, boredom is stronger than ever. Definition of pleasure, as it really is. 3876,1  4074,1 
Wherever pleasure alone is sought, it is never found, which is why the young never find it, etc.; it is necessary to seek some other end. 4266,1 
Pleasure and Pain. Human faculties of these are limited, although greater that of pain. 3823 
Pleasure and Utility. Useful and pleasurable. 986,1  987,1  1165,1  1507,1  2157,1 
Pleasure of the ancient. 1429  2263,1 
Pleasure of desperation. 1628,1  2217,1 
Pleasure of elegance. 1434,2  1579,3 
Pleasure of dwelling on unpleasant thoughts or sensations. 88,2 
Pleasure of inaction and rest. 4180,4 
Pleasure of the languor of body or spirit, of not caring, etc. 1580,1  1584,2  1628,1  1779,1  1792,1  3842,2  3846,2  3905,1  4074,1 
Pleasure of reading about great and virtuous actions. 124,1  3480,1 
Pleasure of reading poetry. 259,2  1574,1  3158,1 
Pleasure of observing the defects of people who are esteemed and loved. 661,3 
Pleasure of the purity of language. 1435,1  Vedi Piacere dell'eleganza. See Pleasure of elegance.
Pleasure of surprise. 188,4  2239,1 
Pleasing everyone, impossible, etc. 4188,8 
Small pleasures, their importance. 2451,1 
Pleasures resulting simultaneously from many causes, even opposite ones. 1967,1 
Laziness. 2702,1  Vedi Negligenza. Inazione, ec.  See Negligence. Inaction, etc.
Plautus. 10,1 
Plutarch. 2410  3475 
Poetry. Vedi Verso. Romanticismo ec. See Verse. Romanticism, etc.
[Poetry.] Divided in three genres: lyric, epic and drama. 4234,5 
[Poetry.] Custodian of the antiquity and purity of language. 2640,1  3008,1 [3009,1]   3417-19 
[Poetry.] Cannot be contemporary. 2944,1 
[Poetry.] Should have a small effect on children. 1799,1 
[Poetry.] The melancholic one also needs happy moments. 136,1 
The corruption and decadence of every poetic genre, usually begins right after its first work is created. 3290 
Poetry and philosophy. Their interrelations. Today they are the most disdained disciplines, not so in antiquity. 3382,2 
Descriptive poetry. 164,2  2041,1  2361,1  2599,1  3479,1  3548,2 
Imaginative poetry and sentimental poetry. 1448,1  1860,1  2159,1  3119,segg.  3154,1  3158,1 
Italian poetry. 700,1 
Modern poetry is always melancholic, not so the ancient. 3976,1 
The poet should not allow himself to be thought of as ugly. 220,3 
[The poet should not allow himself to be thought of as ugly,] nor should he fashion the protagonists to be ugly. 1691,2 
Poets, write well also in prose; not so prose writers in verse. Passage from D. Laertius. 527,2 
[Poets,] cannot write poetry at the height of enthusiasm. 714,1 
Poetic (language). Vedi Lingua poetica. See Poetic language.
Politics. 309,4  574-75  925,2  1826,1 [1826,2]   3773,1  4041,7 
[Politics] cultivated and fashionable in Italy in the 16th century, as elsewhere today. 3129,marg.
Political science of writers and individuals, ancient and modern, a comparison. 3469,1  Vedi Psicologia See Psychology.
Posterity. 826,1  2263,1 
Desire to be famous in posterity, is not natural. 3027,2 
Praeverbia. 1067,1 
Mathematical precision and perfection, is real imperfection in nature. 582-586 
Precision and Clarity and Appropriateness of words. 950,3  1226,1  1234,1  1237,1  1245,2  1488-1489  1701,1  1918  2012,2  2468 
Prejudice. Its force over opinions, tastes, feelings, etc. 1801,1  1832,1  1865,1  2596,1  Vedi Opinioni. See Opinions.
Spring, makes people more discontent with their condition, etc. 2752,1  4250,1  Vedi Inverno. See Winter.
Princes (Congresses of). Application of a witticism reported by Cicero. 4167,9 
For a while now princes have not had a homeland. 4179,4 
Progress of the human spirit. 1347,1  1424,2  1583,1  1720,1  1729,1  1767,1.2  1922,1  1923,1  1975,1  2705,3  2712,1  2948,1  4108,4  4135,5  4189,1  4192,1  4206,4  Vedi Verità. See Truth.
Appropriateness of words. 1482,1  1822,1  1917,2  3747,1  Vedi Precisione e Chiarezza. See Precision and Clarity.
Greek prosody. 307,2  1158,1 
Proverbs. 4249,1 
Provincial (spirit). 2628,1 
Psyche (the fable of). 637,1 
Psychology. 53,1  181,1  1833,2 
[Psychology,] never applied to Politics. 1826,1 [1826,2]  
Punishment. In Europe shameful is not the crime but to be punished. Not so in the USA, and with reason. 4044,8 
Purism. Purist sect among the Latins. 2180,1  2514-2515  2715,2 
[Purism,] among the Greeks. 4147,6 

Q (Inizio pagina)

Human qualities that are considered bad. 655,1 
[Human qualities] that are believed to be innate but actually derive from habit. 2472,1  2489,1  2596,1  2862,1  3027,2  3301,1  3374,1  3466,1  3518,1  3525,1  3804,1  3824,1  4254,4  Vedi Assuefazione. See Habit.
Determinate quantity, cannot be conceived without the help of language. 360,3  2588,3  2658,2  4024,2 
Tenfold division of this [determinate] quantity, very helpful to thought. 1394,1 
Numeric figures. 1398,2 
Vedi Nomi dei numeri. See Names of the numbers.

R (Inizio pagina)

Children's stories. 1401,1 
Reason. Its powerlessness regarding our actions. 1651,1  1727,2  1816,2  3518,1  3613,1 
[Reason.] Is an acquired faculty, not innate. 1680,1 
[Reason.] Is not powerless in itself, but makes man powerless, small, etc. 2941,1 
[Reason.] Harmful and contrary to the social state. 3896,4 
Reason and Imagination. Systems founded on reasoning are never universally received; many of those founded on feeling or imagination are and were universal. 3243-3244 
Relationships. Observation on the relationships in philosophy. 1650,1  1836,1  1854  1922,1  3269,1  3881,4 
Rapidity of style. 2041,1  2336,1  2337,1 
Moral reaction. 47,2 
Republic. Free state. A sure sign of corruption in that society where it is found. 3411,1  Vedi Monarchia. See Monarchy.
Rectitude. Vedi Virtù e Rettitudine. See Virtue and Rectitude.
Rhetoric. Rhetoricians. Their minimal philosophy, derided. Demetrius and his book on elocution. 4216,1  Vedi Musica See Music.
Laughing, necessary in society, etc. 3360,1 
The ridiculous in writings, sayings, etc. 1393,1  1774,2  Vedi Comici. See Comic writers.
Reflection (Habit of). 1714,1 
Reflection. Lack of reflection. 1163,1  1421,2  1998,1  2451,1  2610,1  3040,1  3518,1  3908,1  4010,3  4079,1  4272,2  Vedi Uomini riflessivi. See Reflective individuals.
[Reflection. Lack of reflection.] Passage from Tasso in the Aminta. 2391,1 
Luther's Reformation. 349,1 
Rhyme. 1207,1  1907,1 
Repose and Action in painting and sculpture. 4021,7 
Laughter, familiar to man, the more he is an adult; Crying on the conrary. 4138,2 
Laughter of despair. 107,1  188,1 
Retreat of the ten thousand, compared to the conquest of Mexico. 2479,2 
Portraits. 1302,1  1303,1 
Rome, the only city condemned to obey foreign princes, Emperors and Popes peacefully, regularly, and without being conquered. 4157,2 
Roman (history). Vedi Storia romana. See Roman history.
Romans. Latins. Their language, character, customs, etc. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Romani, Latini. See separate slips entitled Romans, Latins. 735,1  838,1  915,segg.  926,1 [926,2]   979,1.2  980,1.2  981,1  988,1  999,2  1001,1.2  1007,1  1010,2  1012,2  1015,1  1016,1  1024,1  1023,2  1025,1  1029,1  1030-31  1038,1  1039,1  1046,2  1056,1  1067,2  1098,2  1134,1  1116,1  1132,2  1162,3  1295,1  1479  1489  1494,1  1513,1  1518,1  1848,1  1926,1  1956-57  1973,1  2007,1  2012,2  2014,1  2025,1  2036,2  2057,1  2065,1  2068,1  2080,1  2089  2091  2096  2103,1  2112,1  2126,1  2127,1  2130,2  2150,1  2166,1  2172,1  2173,3  2180,1  2181,1  2214  2266  2288,1  2131,1 [2331,1]   2402,1  2408,1  2446  2451,3  2475,1  2514-15  2572,1  2578,1  2589,1  2622,1  2634-35  2643,3  2655,2  2693,1  2694,1  2700,1  2715,2  2717  2729  2731,2  2735,1  2771,2 [2771,3]   2779,2  2829,1  2841,marg. 2876,2  3011  3021,1  3072,3  3192,1  3251,3 [3251-53]   3366,1  3414  3561  3626,segg.  3638,3  3749,2  3818,1  3946,2  3988,1  4001,2  4050,8  4088,5  4090,6  4117,11  4173,8  4214,3  4237,2  4237,3  4243,3  4263,2  4273,2  4280,4  4284,2 
Romans (writers), under the first emperors. 459,1  463,1 
Romans, the most prominent, under the same. 474,2 
Romans, virtuous by virtue of philosophy. 2245,1 
Romanticism. Vedi polizzine a parte, intitolate Romanticismo. See separate slips, entitled Romanticism. 15,1  20,1 [20-21]   21,1  39,1  57,3  73,3  76,4  86,1  100,1  154,1  164,2  177  191,3  203,2  211,2  223,3  225,1  231,2  238,1  261,1  270,1  275-76  285,2  288,1  303,2  307,1  307,2  373,1  470,2  650,1  724,3  865,1  975,2 [975,3]   977,1  986,2  1226,1  1237,1  1245,2  1303,1  1383,1  1414,marg. 1424,3  1549  1671,1  1691,2  1777,2  1798,4  1823,1  1827,2  1847,1  1991,1  2041,1  2429,2  2475,2  2599,1  2636,1  2645,2  2663,1  2738,1  2759,2  2804,1  2857  2944,1  3095,2  3214,1  3221,segg.  3233  3388,1  3461,1  3477,4  3479,1  3482,1  3490,1  3548,2  3680-3681  3946,2  3952,1  3976,1  4216,1  4234,5  4238,4 
Novels. The sentimental. 64,2  650,1  724,3  1436,1  1448,1  1691,2  1903,1  2229  2738,1  3158,1 

S (Inizio pagina)

Priesthood among the ancients. Not divorced from the civil, etc. 2367,3  2635,2  2670,1  3881,1 
Acts of self-sacrifice, etc. 3480,1  3837,1  4103,6 
[Acts of self-sacrifice] were a sign of magnanimity once, today they are considered cowardice. 2440 
[Acts of self-sacrifice] demand self-esteem, etc. 2923,2  4283,2 
[Acts of self-sacrifice] are egoistic towards egoism. 3168,1 
[Acts of self-sacrifice.] Conditions that lead to making them. 3291,1 
Vedi Compassione, Beneficenza. See Compassion, Beneficence.
Human knowledge. Its vanity and foolishness. 490,1  1085,1  1090,1  1091,1  1163,1  2295-2296  2668,1  2672,3  2709,1  2711,1  2800,1  3773,1  4041,7  4189,1  4192,1  4206,4 
Knowledge. Vedi Filosofia antica, e Filosofia moderna. Sommità ec. See ancient philosophy and modern philosophy. Summit, etc.
Flavors. Different opinions about them. 1733,1  1940,1.2  2596,1 
In flavors there is harmony, etc. 1940,2 
Sanskrit (language). 928,2  955,2  975,1  979,1  983,3  984,1  995-996  1010  2351,1  2746,1  2783-2784  2822  3017,1  3941 
[Sanskrit (language),] discovered first by an Italian in the 16th century. 3018,1  4245,7 
Satire. Satirical. Vedi Comici. See Comic writers.
Skepticism. Vedi Dubbio. See Doubt.
Slavery. 911,1  3420,1  4117,9  4121,6  4275  Vedi Stranieri. See Foreigners.
Rights of slaves in Athens. 4245,1 
[Rights of slaves] in Cuba. 4280,3 
Scientific (books or discourses). 1372,1  2725,1 
Knowledge and Ignorance. 246,2  252,1  274,1  304,2  314,1  326,1  331,1  334,3  349,1  375,1  378,1  393,2  420,2  436,1  520,1  595,2  651,1  654,2 [654,1]   866,1  870,1  925,2  1175,1  1252,2  1262,2  1464,1  1825,1  1981,2  2245,1  2292,1  2390,1  2391,1  2554,1  2672,2  2672,3  2684,1  2685,3  3899,1  3993,1  4041,7  4135,5  4206,4 
[Knowledge and Ignorance.] Passage from Ferederick II. 3954,1 
Knowledge infused in man. 436,1 
Sciences and Letters. 1356,2  1708,1 
Exact sciences, i.e. the moral, etc. kind excluded, will never be treated with the art of style. 2725,1 
Scientists, should be poets a little. 58,2  1372,1 
Scholastics. Their vocabulary, useful to modern philosophy, etc. 1222  1317,1  1465,1  1467,1.2  1468,1 
Writing, alphabet, etc. 939  1179,1  1202,1  1263,2  1659,1  2006  2654,1  2869,1  2884,1  2948,1  3670,1  3959,1  4290,2 
The invention of alphabetical writing was a single one. 2619,2  2740,1  3670,1  3957,1 
Writing cluttered with dashes and new signs. 975,2 [975,3]   977,1 
Scripture. Vedi Bibbia. See Bible.
Writing and Doing. Literature and philosophy, and Action. 598,4  2453,1  3899,1  3993,1 
The nineteenth century. 1077,1  4120,20  4167,9  4172,8.9  4189,1  4056,4  4192,1  4206,4  4269,2 
Secrets. 339,2  1535,1  2471,1 
Demigods. 3494,1  Vedi Démoni. Divinità antiche. See Daemons. Ancient divinities.
Simplicity. 237,2  1365,1  1404,1  1411,1  1449,1  1689,1  1915,1  2037,2  2498,1  2545,1  3047,1  3050,1  3490,1  Vedi Naturalezza. See Naturalness.
Simplicity of the system of human and universal nature. 2133  2637 
Sensations, images and thoughts that are experienced without any act either by external objects or by the will. 183,4  1384  1454,1 
Man's inclination to experience sensations in themselves. No sensation is indifferent. 4060,1 
Sensitivity. Vedi Vitalità. See Vitality.
Sentimental. Vedi Romanzi. See Novels.
Sentimental love, born of the use of clothing. 3301,1 
[Sentimental love,] is easier with foreigners. 4293,2 
Feeling. Vedi Immaginazione e Sentimento. Sensibilità. See Imagination and Feeling. Sensitivity.
Feeling cited as proof of what cannot be demonstrated by means of reason. The ridiculousness of such philosophizing. It was also the case with some ancients. 4219,1  Vedi Ragione e Immaginazione. See Reason and Imagination.
Tombs. 471,1 
Burying the bodies of the dead prescribed by Greek myths; proof of its usefulness and at the same time a sign of the intent of ancient poetry and religion, of poets and priests. 3430,2  Vedi Mitologie. See Mythologies.
Servants. 106,1  4275,1 
Northern and Southern (life, imagination, spirit), ancient and modern. Modern superiority of northerners is an accident of civilization. 3676,1  4062,5  4256,1 
Ancient civilization was southern, morally and geographically; the modern is northern. 4256,1 
Vedi Caratteri meridionali e settentrionali. Orientali. See Southern and northern characters. Oriental people.
Gracelessness. 1329,3 
Italian "si", "sibi", etc., redundant. 3971,marg. 4046,3  4083,5  4110,4  4237,9 
Sulla. 135,1  629,1 
Syllogism. 1771,1 
Symbols. Vedi Mitologie. See Mythologies.
Symmetry. 186,1  1259,1 
Synizeses. 1151,1  2247,2  2339,1  2656,marg. 2889,3  3351,1  3684,6  3735,1  4036,6  4103,3  Vedi Concorso delle vocali. Dittonghi ec. See Concurrence of vowels. Diphthongs.
Systems in philosophy. 945,1  1089,1  1090,1  1091,1  2705,3-2712,1  3977,1 
A great proof of the progress of human spirit and the sciences: there has been no new system of physics since Newton. 4056,4 
Societies of the animals. Vedi Animali. See Animals.
Ancient Greek sophists. Their difference from the classics, what does it consist of. 3472,1 
Dreams. 516,1 
Solitude. 633,1  636,1  653,1 [653,2]   678,3  717,3  2471,1  2684,1  3410,1  3676,1  4259,5 
[Solitude.] Necessary to the metaphysician. The reflective man, living a solitary life, naturally turns to abstract philosophy and that of universal nature. 4138,3 
Summit of knowledge and ignorance. 449 
Highest good. Vedi Fine o Sommo bene. See End or Highest Good.
Sleep. 193,1  3895,1 
Spanish (language and literature). Observations on these, and how they could be useful to the Italians. Their character, history, etc. 3389,1  3829,1  3855,1  3956,2  4055,6 
Spartans and Martyrs. 44,4 
Example of constancy or of Spartan stoicism, mixed with stupidity. 4183,1 
Fright. 262,3  2803,1 
[Fright,] produced by the sight of beauty and by the first moment of conceiving any intense desire. 3443,1 
Hope. 183,3  285,1  364,2  522,2  826,1  1017,1  1044,2  1521,2  1545,1  1547,1  1589,1  1628,1  1792,1  1863,1  2315,1  2451,1  2526,1  2638,1  3265,1  3497,1  4272,2 
[Hope,] continuous and inseparable from feeling and thinking life. 4145,4 
Hope and fear. 66,2  105,3  188,3  364,2  458,1  1303,2  3433,1  4123,9 
"To hope" used for "to wait". 3571,2  4123,9 
Speusippus. His contibution to human knowledge. 334,2 
Ghosts (fear of). 531,1  535,1  262,3  2299,2 
Rough breathing of the Greeks changed into an -s. 109,2  983,3 [983,4]   1276,1  2143,1  2195,1  2329,1  2889,1  3071,1  3815,3  4035,4  4154,1  4172,12  4182,1  4196,4  4208,3  4234,1  4243,4  4245,8  4255,4  4265,3 
Spirit (esprit). 3854,2  3881,4  3886,4 
Seasons, whether they become increasingly colder, as they say. Passage from Magalotti. 4241,5 
Printing. 939 
Style. Can alone constitute poetry; in order to simply have poetic style, one has to be a true poet. 2050,1 [2049,1]   2056,1  2468  2979-80  3388,1  3717,1 
There was never a barbarous style with good language, nor vice versa. 3398-99  3419 
The art of style, what it consists of. 2611,2  3952,1 
[The art of style.] Its difficulty. 2725,1  3673,1  3952,1  4021,5 
[The art of style.] Proper exclusively to the ancients. 2914,1  3439,1  4213,7 
The French and the moderns do not have style. 2906,2 
Among the ancients, style was everything. 4213,7 
Style can barely be distinguished from language. 2906,2 
[Style.] Its effect, substantially different in various readers. 3952,1 
Today those who, in writing, seek a perfect style, are writing for the dead. 4240,1 [4240,2]  
Style today is useless, although literary immortality is impossible without it. 4268,7 
Vedi Arte del comporre. Francese (stile). Francesi e moderni. See Art of composition. French (style). French and moderns.
Greek and Latin style. Its character. 3401,1 
Esteem accorded to people of intellect. 263,2  455,1  3183,1  4153,5 
Self-esteem. It is in inverse proportion to the esteem one has for one's science, profession, etc. 4285,5 
[Self-esteem.] In those famous, who deserve it, it is always smaller than the one others give them. 4062,1 
[Self-esteem.] Even the meanest of characters need it. 3480,1 
Persone di compagnia durevolmente piacevole, non sono altro che quelle la cui stima ci par valere il pregio di essere proccurata e accresciuta continuamente. People of lastingly pleasant company are those whose esteem, in our opinion, merits to be constantly gained and increased. 4294,5 
History. 120,1  709,1 
Roman history, after Tacitus, has only Greek writers. 2731,2 
Hitory, Hebrew, Trojan, Greek and Roman. 191,3  1848,marg. 2645,2  3145-46  3770-71 
Natural history. Unreasonableness of this term and the idea following from it, which, however, cannot be changed. 4214,4 
Histories, stories, traditions, stolen by one writer and nation from another. 4152,6 
Sub in compounds, for in su. 3003  3711,2  4015,1  4160,8  4197,1  4283,4 
Sublimity in writing. 3490,1 
Serious misfortune, etc. 126,2  366,2 
Misfortunes. 633,1  636,1  653,1 [653,2]   678,3  712,1  717,3  931,1  958,1  960,2  2159,1  3529,1 
[Misfortunes.] Make man inactive and useless, chilling self-love, etc. 958,1  2876,1 
[Misfortunes.] Extinguish compassion. 2628,2 
[Misfortunes.] Make happiness sweeter. 2661,1 
[Misfortunes.] The sensitive man gets used to them faster. 2208,2 
Suicide. 183,3  273,2  484,1  503,1  829,2  1547,1  2241,1  2492,1  2549,1  3883 
[Suicide.] In antiquity it was more common among the old than among the young, today the reverse; and why. 2987,3 
Sum es est. Its ancient conjugation, its participles, etc. 1120,1 [1120,2]   1390,1  2142,1  2352  2659,1  2663,5  2783  2784  2785  2821,3  2894,1  2926,2  3742,2  3742,3  3759,1  3849,1  3885,1  3937,2  3940,1  3999,2  4008,3  4086,4  4096,1  4121,11  4155,1  Vedi Verbo sostantivo. See Substantive verbs.
Pride. 669,1  926,1 
[Pride.] How it can be good, according to an ancient author. 324,2 
National pride. 119,1 [119,2]   923,1 [923,2]   1420,1  1728,1 
[National pride.] Observations on this quality; considered practically in the French and in the English. 4261,2 
Superstition. 3894,2 

T (Inizio pagina)

Tobacco. 4188,1 
Tacitus. Livy. 1353  2043  2409-10  Vedi Tiberio See Tiberius.
Tasso and Dante, both poets who suffered misfortune; yet, the first is interesting and inspires compassion, the other not; and why. 4255,6 
Theatres. Theatrical and dramatic plots among the Greeks; how much more interesting than the modern ones. 4203,1 
German (philosophy). 1835,1  1848,1  2616,1  3237,1  3680,1  Vedi Immaginazione, quanto serva al filosofare, ec. See Imagination, the extent to which it serves philosophy, etc.
Time. Use of time. 43,2  1075,2  Vedi Negligenza. See Negligence.
Idea of the duration of time, how relative and varied. 3509,1 
Time and space. Ideas or names, and not things. 4181,1  4233,1 
Theophrastus. Vedi Aristotele. See Aristotle.
Theology, how it has benefited the human spirit. 1465,1  1467,1.2  1468,1 
Thick-heads. 1752,1  [1680,1]  
Fulvio Testi. 23,6  28,3 
Tiberius (character of). Perhaps not so affected and political as has been depicted. 4194,1 
Shy people. Shyness in society, etc. 3488,2  4037,6 
Shyness, loveable. 3765,1 
Fear. 364,2  2803,1  3488,2  3518,1  Vedi Coraggio. Speranza e timore. See Courage. Hope and fear.
Tyranny. 252,1  274,1  314,1  507,1  573-74  Vedi Despotismo, ec. See Despotism.
Tragedies with a happy ending. 3122  3448,1 
Greek tragedies. Their true spirit and poetic purpose. 3482,1 
Tranquillity of life. 298-299  536,3 
[Tranquillity of life,] cannot be attained, especially by people with imagination, except by being occupied externally: the more peaceful life is materially, the more unquiet it is morally. 4259,5  4266,1 
Three ways of seeing things. 102,2 
Three successive stages of youth. 4180,3 
14th century authors. Vedi Cinquecentisti, Trecentisti. See 16th, 14th century authors.
Triumphs among the Romans. 1016,1  1445,2 
Too much is father of nothing. 714,1  1176,1  1260,2  1653,2  1776,2  2274,1  2478  2656,3  3951  4026,6  Vedi Volontà intensa. See Intense wish.
Thunder, pleasurable, and why. 4293,4 
Turks. Hatred against the Turks in the sixteenth century. Crusades. 3127,segg. 
Everything is evil. 4174,2  4257,11  Vedi Contraddizioni e mostruosità ec. Artifizio ec. See Contradictions and monstrosities. Artifice etc.

U. V. (Inizio pagina)

The letter U. Vedi I, U, Y, O, U. See I, U, Y; O, U.
Variety. 51,3 [51,2]   128,2  147,1  186,1  368,1  721,1  1022,1  1028,1  1045,1  1386,1  1459,1  1507,2  1629,1  1655,1  1826,2  1827,2  1831,2  1966  2405,1  2599,1  2661,1  Vedi Monotonia. Uniformità. See Monotony. Uniformity.
Variety in the physiognomy of beasts, foreigners, etc. in foreign writings, etc, is usually unrecognized; and why. 1399,1  2563,1  2564,1 
Vastness, pleasurable. 2053,1  2629,2 
Drunkenness. 109,3  152,1  1581,1  1975,1  3835,1  3924-3925  4079,1  Vedi Vino. See Wine.
Birds. Bird song. 159,1  1722 
[Birds.] Why we like their sight. 1716,2 
Old people, why they love life so much. 294,1  1420,2  2643,1  2987,3  3029,2  4116,1 
Speed, pleasurable. 1999,1 
Revenge. 72,3  829,1  1794,1  3795,1  3942,2 
Substantive verb "to be" and other such most necessary and common verbs are irregular in all languages. 1390,1  Vedi Sum es est. See Sum es est.
Truth. No truth can be known perfectly. 1090,1  1091,1  1239,1  1838,1 
It is useful to seek the proof of known truths. 1239,1 
Way in which great truths are discovered. 1347,1  1975,1  2019,2  3269,1  3382,2  3552,2  3881,4  4108,4 
Way in which they [(great truths)] are communicated. 1583,1  Vedi Progressi dello spirito umano. See The progress of human spirit.
All truths have multiple facets. 1632,1  1766,1  2527,1  3956,3 
True. Those whose spirit is capable only of pure truth cannot know truth very well. 1961,3  Vedi Immaginazione, quanto serva al filosofare, ec. See Imagination, the extent to which it serves philosophy, etc.
Verse. Versification. 1695,1 
Modern poetry is better suited by prose. 2171,1 
Wine. 324,4  496,2  1581,1  1800,2  3269,1  3552,2  3881,4  Vedi Ubbriachezza. See Drunkenness.
Pleasure of wine, is a mix of a bodily and of a spiritual kind. 4286,4 
Virgil. 3417  3719  4067  Vedi Epopea. Omero. See Epic. Homer.
Virtue. 893,1  978,1  1100,1  1554,2  1827,1  2156,1  2245,1  2473,1  2574,1 
[Virtue.] Was a synonym of force, and referred only to strong virtues. 2215,1  3134,1  4268,6